Navigation Links
Smoking bans reduce the risk of heart attacks associated with secondhand smoke
Date:10/15/2009

WASHINGTON -- Smoking bans are effective at reducing the risk of heart attacks and heart disease associated with exposure to secondhand smoke, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. The report also confirms there is sufficient evidence that breathing secondhand smoke boosts nonsmokers' risk for heart problems, adding that indirect evidence indicating that even relatively brief exposures could lead to a heart attack is compelling.

"It's clear that smoking bans work," said Lynn Goldman, professor of environmental health sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, and chair of the committee of experts that wrote the report. "Bans reduce the risks of heart attack in nonsmokers as well as smokers. Further research could explain in greater detail how great the effect is for each of these groups and how secondhand smoke produces its toxic effects. However, there is no question that smoking bans have a positive health effect."

About 43 percent of nonsmoking children and 37 percent of nonsmoking adults are exposed to secondhand smoke in the United States, according to public health data. Despite significant reductions in the percentages of Americans breathing environmental tobacco smoke over the past several years, roughly 126 million nonsmokers were still being exposed in 2000.

A 2006 report from the U.S. Surgeon General's office, THE HEALTH CONSEQUENCES OF INVOLUNTARY EXPOSURE TO TOBACCO SMOKE, concluded that exposure to secondhand smoke causes heart disease and indicated that smoke-free policies are the most economical and effective way to reduce exposure. However, the effectiveness of smoking bans in reducing heart problems has continued to be a source of debate.

The IOM committee conducted a comprehensive review of published and unpublished data and testimony on the relationship between secondhand smoke and short-term and long-term heart problems. Eleven key studies that evaluated the effects of smoking bans on heart attack rates informed the committee's conclusions about the positive effects of smoke-free policies. The studies calculated that reductions in the incidence of heart attacks range from 6 percent to 47 percent. Given the variations in how the studies were conducted and what they measured, the committee could not determine more precisely how great the effect is. Only two of the studies distinguished between reductions in heart attacks suffered by smokers versus nonsmokers. However, the repeated finding of decreased heart attack rates overall after bans were implemented conclusively demonstrates that smoke-free policies help protect people from the cardiovascular effects of tobacco smoke, the committee said.

The report also provides a detailed discussion of the evidence from animal research and epidemiological studies showing a cause-and-effect relationship between secondhand smoke exposure and heart problems. The committee was not able to determine the exact magnitude of the increased risk presented by breathing environmental tobacco smoke, but noted that studies consistently indicate it increases the risks by 25 percent to 30 percent. Although there is no direct evidence that a relatively brief exposure to secondhand smoke could precipitate a heart attack, the committee found the indirect evidence compelling. Data on particulate matter in smoke from other pollution sources suggest that a relatively brief exposure to such substances can initiate a heart attack, and particulate matter is a major component of secondhand smoke.


'/>"/>

Contact: Christine Stencel
news@nas.edu
202-334-2138
National Academy of Sciences
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. First Commercial Text Messaging Smoking Cessation Service Marks One Year of Operation
2. Teen smoking-cessation trial first to achieve significant quit rates
3. Stop-Smoking Vaccine in the Works
4. Award recognizes 30 years of anti-smoking work
5. Smoking bans effects on heart disease risks -- IOM report releases Oct. 15
6. Study Counters Warnings on Quit-Smoking Drug
7. Smoking in Pregnancy Linked to Psychotic Symptoms in Kids
8. Smoking during pregnancy puts children at risk of psychotic symptoms
9. Teen attitudes toward smoking linked to likelihood of drinking and using drugs
10. A consistent decline in heart attack rates following the implementation of smoking bans
11. Smoking Bans Bring a Drop in Heart Attacks
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/7/2018)... Mich. (PRWEB) , ... August 07, 2018 , ... Sussex ... partnered with Blue Sky Vision. Michael Sussex, OD, founded the practice in Coldwater, and ... Sussex practices with Matt Austin, OD, to offer comprehensive eye health services for patients ...
(Date:8/7/2018)... ... August 07, 2018 , ... The American Psychiatric Nurses ... receive the 2018 Board of Directors Student Scholarship . The APNA student ... health nursing and develop the next generation of leaders in the profession. ...
(Date:8/3/2018)... ... 03, 2018 , ... On August 2, 2018 the JPML ordered that the ... Sadaka Associates, LLC has been litigating Zostavax injuries since 2011. ... Multidistrict Litigation for the thousands of people injured by Zostavax, a vaccine given to ...
(Date:8/3/2018)... ... , ... Lucyd Pte Ltd, the developer of an eShop ... online store. The Lucyd eShop will feature the latest technologies and trends in ... The eShop will have a number of unique benefits over other eyewear shops, ...
(Date:8/2/2018)... ... August 02, 2018 , ... ... image e-sharing platform to connect clinicians inside and outside the network to vital ... stroke or trauma. , AHN joins other leading hospital systems nationwide in using ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/7/2018)... ... August 07, 2018 , ... ... demand for spinal fusion alternatives, has begun training and certifying spine physicians across ... first of fourteen physicians received training at the Weill Cornell Brain and Spine ...
(Date:8/3/2018)... N.J. (PRWEB) , ... August 03, 2018 , ... Flexefits, ... for passing H.R. 6199, especially for its allowing participants in Direct Primary Care arrangements ... covered by HSAs (capped at $150 per individual and $300 per family per month.) ...
(Date:8/2/2018)... ... ... What: The Wharton School is pleased to invite business journalists to ... business reporters who cover aspects of public policy to attend the Wharton Seminars ... covers the cost of tuition, course materials, most group meals, lodging for three nights ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: