Navigation Links
People With HIV at Higher Odds of Sudden Cardiac Death
Date:5/14/2012

MONDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- People with HIV/AIDS are four times more likely to die of sudden cardiac arrest than those in the general population, a new study finds.

The findings held true even for people with well-controlled HIV, according to researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). In sudden cardiac arrest, also referred to as sudden cardiac death, the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating.

The researchers looked at the health records of more than 2,800 HIV patients from April 2000 to August 2009. About 8 percent died during an average follow-up period of nearly four years.

Cardiac-related events accounted for 15 percent of those deaths. Of those, 86 percent of the patients died of sudden cardiac death.

When researchers accounted for age, race and other variables, people with HIV had more than four times the risk of experiencing sudden cardiac death compared to the overall population of San Francisco.

"The fact that the vast majority of cardiac deaths were sudden is surprising and implies that we as clinicians need to be aware of this potential health issue among patients with HIV," senior study author Dr. Priscilla Hsue, an associate professor of medicine at UCSF and director of the HIV Cardiology Clinic at San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center, said in a university news release.

"Our findings also highlight many things that we still don't know about HIV and sudden death," she added. "Did these individuals die of unrecognized coronary artery disease? What can we be doing as clinicians to identify patients at risk and to intervene beforehand?"

The study appears in the May 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

In 2003, sudden cardiac death accounted for the largest number of non-AIDS deaths among HIV patients in San Francisco. These sudden cardiac deaths occurred mostly in patients with well-controlled HIV.

"Now that HIV-infected individuals are living longer with the benefit of antiretroviral therapy, non-AIDS conditions are becoming increasingly important and at the top of this list is cardiovascular disease," said study first author Dr. Zian Tseng, an electrophysiologist and associate professor of medicine in the UCSF division of cardiology.

Although this research showed an association between HIV/AIDS and increased incidence of sudden cardiac death, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about sudden cardiac arrest.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: University of California-San Francisco, news release, May 14, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Older People With Dementia Cared for Mostly at Home
2. People Love Talking About Themselves, Brain Scans Show
3. Migraines More Likely for People With Celiac Disease, Study Says
4. Good intentions bring mixed results for Haitis disabled people
5. CT Scans Deliver More Radiation to Obese People: Study
6. People Carrying Guns May Appear Bigger Than They Are
7. Anxiety Might Help People Sniff Out Threats
8. Normal triglyceride levels in people of African descent may hinder diagnosis of metabolic syndrome
9. Most People Cant Tell a Tree Nut From a Peanut
10. Tecnalia develops a flexible system for resting for people with reduced mobility
11. People With Autism May Be Better at Processing Information
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Austin residents seeking Mohs surgery ... of Mohs Surgery and to Dr. Russell Peckham for medical and surgical dermatology. , ... for skin cancer. The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic Surgery completed by Dr. Dorsey ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... "With 30 hand-drawn ... specific project," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProHand ... all within Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ProHand generator and ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar Marathe ... from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal Medicine ... his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had the ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... On Friday, June 10, Van Mitchell, Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health ... of their exemplary accomplishments in worksite health promotion. , The Wellness at Work Awards ... at the BWI Marriott in Linthicum Heights. iHire was one of 42 businesses to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... A recent article ... are unfamiliar with. The article goes on to state that individuals are now more ... these less common operations such as calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles area ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... Chemical (Sugar, Petrochemical, Glycerin), Inorganic Chemical), Functionality (Filler, Binder, ... Forecast to 2021" report to their offering. ... excipients market is projected to reach USD 8.1 Billion ... forecast period 2016 to 2021. The ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Research and Markets has ... 52" report to their offering. ... creates a favourable commercial environment for MedImmune to enter. The ... that will serve to drive considerable growth for effective anti-influenza ... to cap sales considerably, but development is still in its ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Revolutionary technology includes multi-speaker ... , industry leaders in advanced audiology and hearing aid ... Opn ™, the world,s first internet connected hearing aid ... devices.      (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160622/382240 ) ... of ,world firsts,: , TwinLink™ - the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: