Navigation Links
Glazer receives grant to study light-activated cancer drugs
Date:1/31/2013

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 31, 2013) University of Kentucky assistant professor of chemistry Edith "Phoebe" Glazer has received an American Cancer Society Research Scholar Grant for $715,000 over four years to continue her research into ruthenium-based cancer drugs. These compounds are less toxic to healthy cells than a similar and widely used inorganic drug.

Cisplatin is a common platinum-based cancer drug used in a variety of cancer treatments. But while cisplatin kills cancer cells, it also attacks healthy cells, causing debilitating side effects. Ruthenium is another transition metal and belongs to the same group of the periodic table as iron.

Previously, the Glazer group developed two new ruthenium complexes designed to kill cancer cells while preserving healthy cells. These complexes are inert in the dark, but when activated with light, they become up to 200 times as toxic, and up to three times as potent as cisplatin against tumor cells.

Funded by the American Cancer Society, the new grant will allow Glazer's team to develop improved ruthenium-based compounds and to study their effectiveness. Using the strategy of combining organic ligands as building blocks that assemble around the ruthenium center "core," a large family of compounds with different structures and properties can be rapidly synthesized. This is in marked contrast to approaches using compounds discovered in nature, called natural products, as chemotherapeutics.

Many chemotherapeutics are natural products, but their synthesis is challenging and there are limited chemical modifications that can be made into the molecules. In the ruthenium compounds, the organic components can be easily changed to alter chemical properties and possibly even what types of cells the compounds will enter in the body. The different structures can also potentially prevent the development of drug resistance, as tumors that become resistant to one particular ruthenium drug structure could be vulnerable to another ruthenium compound with a different structure.

The efficacy of the compounds will be tested in different human cancer cell lines and in animal models to determine what cancer types can be treated. The group will also determine the biochemical process by which the compounds kill cells in order to optimize the drugs. The long-term goal of the research is to develop a targeted chemotherapeutic approach with reduced side effects that can be applied to a variety of cancer types.


'/>"/>

Contact: Allison Perry
allison.perry@uky.edu
859-323-2399
University of Kentucky
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Loyola Cancer Center receives Outstanding Achievement Award
2. MU receives national award for using mind-body approach to improve health
3. Neuropsychologist receives University of Houstons highest faculty honor
4. Boston researcher, surgical oncologist receives national award
5. LA BioMed receives Grand Challenges Explorations grant
6. Lawson researcher receives 1 of first-ever Pfizer Psychiatry Research Awards
7. Dr. Arthur Slutsky, vice-president of research at St. Michaels, receives lifetime award
8. UC San Diego Superfund Research Program receives $15 million grant renewal
9. Markey receives $6.25 million to study deadly blood and bone marrow disease
10. Feola, at University of Kentucky, receives NIH grant to study cystic fibrosis
11. UC Santa Barbaras Kavli Institute receives 2 grants to explore interface of physics and biology
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/26/2016)... Orion, Clarkston, Michigan (PRWEB) , ... June 26, ... ... with respect to fertility once they have been diagnosed with endometriosis. These women ... intercourse but they also require a comprehensive approach that can help for preservation ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to a possible ... often overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from a human ... but a necessary one in the event that lice have simply gotten out of control. ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar Marathe earned his Bachelors ... Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal Medicine at Scripps Green ... hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had the opportunity to train ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether it’s a matter of ... too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, those who set the ... Research from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency to set low expectations ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... June 19, 2016 is World Sickle Cell Observance Day. In an effort to ... treatments, Serenity Recovery Center of Marne, Michigan, has issued a pain management ... (SCD) is a disorder of the red blood cells, which can cause episodes of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016 The Academy of Managed Care ... that would allow biopharmaceutical companies to more easily ... make formulary and coverage decisions, a move that addresses ... medicines. The recommendations address restrictions in the ... the drug label, a prohibition that hinders decision makers ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... DUBLIN , June 24, 2016 ... "The World Market for Companion Diagnostic Tests" report to ... World Market for Companion Diagnostics The World ... diagnostic and personalized medicine diagnostics. Market analysis in the report ... Diagnostics Test Market (In Vitro Diagnostic Kits) by Region (N. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , Belgium , June 24, ... VNRX), today announced the appointment of Dr. ... Directors as a Non-Executive Director, effective June 23, ... Audit, Compensation and Nominations and Governance Committees.  As ... Futcher will provide independent expertise and strategic counsel ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: