Navigation Links
Fewer children at risk for deficient vitamin D
Date:3/25/2014

MAYWOOD, Il. Under new guidelines from the Institute of Medicine, the estimated number of children who are at risk for having insufficient or deficient levels of vitamin D is drastically reduced from previous estimates, according to a Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine study.

The study, led by Holly Kramer, MD, MPH and Ramon Durazo-Arvizu, PhD, is published online ahead of print in the Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism.

New Institute of Medicine guidelines say most people get sufficient vitamin D when their blood levels are at or above 20 nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL). The Pediatric Endocrine Society has a similar guideline. However, other guidelines recommend vitamin D levels above 30 ng/mL.

Loyola researchers analysed vitamin D data from a nationally representative sample of 2,877 U.S. children and adolescents ages 6 to 18 who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

The study found that under the Institute of Medicine guidelines, 10.3 percent of children ages 6 to 18 are at risk of inadequate or deficient vitamin D levels. (This translates to an estimated 5.5 million children.)

By comparison, a 2009 study in the journal Pediatrics, which defined sufficient vitamin D levels as greater than 30 ng/mL, found that an estimated 70 percent of persons ages 1 to 21 had deficient or insufficient vitamin D levels.

Under previous guidelines, millions of children who had vitamin D levels between 20 and 30 ng/mL would have needed supplementation. Under the Institute of Medicine guidelines, children in this range no longer need to take vitamin D supplements.

The new study found that children at risk of vitamin D deficiency under the Institute of Medicine guidelines are more likely to be overweight, female, non-white and between the ages of 14 and 18.

The Institute of Medicine's new vitamin D guidelines are based on nearly 1,000 published studies and testimony from scientists and other experts. The IOM found that vitamin D is essential to avoid poor bone health, such as rickets. But there have been conflicting and mixed results in studies on whether vitamin D can also protect against cancer, heart disease, autoimmune diseases and diabetes. Moreover, excessive vitamin D can damage the kidneys and heart, the IOM found.


'/>"/>
Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Discoveries point to more powerful cancer treatments, fewer side effects
2. Aging men: More uplifts, fewer hassles until the age of 65-70
3. Pregnancy study leads to fewer high birth weight babies
4. Fewer than half of women attend recommended doctors visits after childbirth
5. The secret to fewer doctor office visits after 70 -- play high school sports
6. Breast cancer patients experience fewer side effects from anticancer drug
7. More alcohol and traffic laws mean fewer traffic deaths, NYU Steinhardt study concludes
8. Blacks happier at work than whites despite fewer friends, less autonomy
9. Diet Doc Hormone Diets & Weight Loss Plans Announces New Diet Plans Helping Women Lose Excess Fat Prior to Pregnancy, Which Studies Show Leads to Fewer Complications
10. Graphic warnings labels on cigarette packs could lead to 8.6 million fewer smokers in the US
11. Fewer weeks of hormone therapy before radiation reduces side effects in intermediate risk PCa
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... who administered fillers that resulted in severe facial disfiguration. After four frightening years ... by doctors at UCLA Medical Center, who removed the substances in a partial ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... Workrite Ergonomics ... , The Tranquility privacy panel system was designed to deliver the ideal ... help reduce noise and provide the visual privacy required to maintain concentration levels ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... Sam & Associates Insurance Agency, a full service ... in the California Bay Area, is launching a charity drive to raise awareness of ... disease is the primary killer of adult men and women in America, and is ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... agency which serves Lawrenceville, New Jersey and the surrounding area, is inaugurating ... lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease or motor neurone ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... Creative ... Create Real Impact contest from Impact Teen Drivers and California Casualty. Entries from ... , Educational grants totaling $15,000 will be awarded for the best peer-to-peer ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... Jan. 19, 2017  Stealth BioTherapeutics Inc. ( Stealth ... mitochondrial dysfunction, today announced new additions to its senior ... Chief Medical Officer, and Daniel Geffken as ... Jim Carr , Pharm.D. has been promoted to ... pleased to welcome Doug and Daniel to our management ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... Jan. 19, 2017  Abaxis, Inc. (NasdaqGS: ... analysis instruments and consumables for the medical and veterinary ... its financial results for the third quarter fiscal year ... at 4:15 p.m. ET on Thursday, January 26, 2017.  ... quarter fiscal year 2017 after the market closes on ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... Massachusetts , January 19, 2017 ... ) announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... of a New Drug Application (NDA) for SHP465, a ... evaluated as a potential once-daily treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder ... on or around June 20, 2017, the designated Prescription ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: