Navigation Links
Anti-smoking ads with strong arguments, not flashy editing, trigger part of brain involving behavior change

PHILADELPHIA Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have shown that an area of the brain that initiates behavioral changes had greater activation in smokers who watched anti-smoking ads with strong arguments versus those with weaker ones, and irrespective of flashy elements, like bright and rapidly changing scenes, loud sounds and unexpected scenario twists. Those smokers also had significantly less nicotine metabolites in their urine when tested a month after viewing those ads, the team reports in a new study published online April 23 in the Journal of Neuroscience.

This is the first time research has shown an association between cognition and brain activity in response to content and format in televised ads and behavior.

In a study of 71 non-treatment-seeking smokers recruited from the Philadelphia area, the team, led by Daniel D. Langleben, M.D., a psychiatrist in the Center for Studies of Addiction at Penn Medicine, identified key brain regions engaged in the processing of persuasive communications using fMRI, or functional magnetic resonance imaging. They found that a part of the brain involved in future behavioral changesknown as the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC)had greater activation when smokers watched an anti-smoking ad with a strong argument versus a weak one.

One month after subjects watched the ads, the researchers sampled smokers' urine cotinine levels (metabolite of nicotine) and found that those who watched the strong ads had significantly less cotinine in their urine compared to their baseline versus those who watched weaker ads.

Even ads riddled with attention-grabbing tactics, the research suggests, are not effective at reducing tobacco intake unless their arguments are strong. However, ads with flashy editing and strong arguments, for example, produced better recognition.

"We investigated the two major dimensions of any piece of media, content and format, which are both important here," said Dr. Langleben, who is also an associate professor in the department of Psychiatry. "If you give someone an unconvincing ad, it doesn't matter what format you do on top of that. You can make it sensational. But in terms of effectiveness, content is more important. You're better off adding in more sophisticated editing and other special effects only if it is persuasive."

The paper may enable improved methods of design and evaluation of public health advertising, according to the authors, including first author An-Li Wang, PhD, of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania. And it could ultimately influence how producers shape the way ads are constructed, and how ad production budgets are allocated, considering special effects are expensive endeavors versus hiring screenwriters.

A 2009 study by Dr. Langleben and colleagues that looked solely at format found people were more likely to remember low-key, anti-smoking messages versus attention-grabbing messages. This was the first research to show that low-key versus attention-grabbing ads stimulated different patterns of activity, particularly in the frontal cortex and temporal cortex. But it did not address content strength or behavioral changes.

This new study is the first longitudinal investigation of the cognitive, behavioral, and neurophysical response to the content and format of televised anti-smoking ads, according to the authors.

"This sets the stage for science-based evaluation and design of persuasive public health advertising," said Dr. Langleben. "An ad is only as strong as its central argument, which matters more than its audiovisual presentation. Future work should consider supplementing focus groups with more technology-heavy assessments, such as brain responses to these ads, in advance of even putting the ad together in its entirety."


Contact: Steve Graff
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Related medicine news :

1. Small neural focus groups predict anti-smoking ad success
2. Anti-Smoking Ads Have Increased Quit Attempts: CDC
3. Anti-Smoking Progress Stalls Among U.S. Adults: Report
4. Genes May Influence Effectiveness of Anti-Smoking Policies
5. Symptomatic behaviour in childhood strongly predicts psychiatric treatment as a young adult
6. Military Marriages Stay Strong in Face of Challenges: Study
7. Does dinner make a strong family, or does a strong family make dinner?
8. Gastroenterology, CGH maintain strong 2011 impact factors
9. Strong communication between brain and muscle requires both having the protein LRP4
10. A stronger doctor-patient relationship for the costliest patients
11. First identification of a strong oral carcinogen in smokeless tobacco
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... ... to an article published October 6th by the Herald Tribune, a recent study ... taken in 1988 has shown that it really is more difficult to lose weight these ... someone in 1971 would be on average 10 pounds heavier than their past counterpart. In ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... October 12, 2015 , ... ... 19, 2015, high school aged female athletes, particularly in the area of track ... motion and mechanical overuse injuries than male peers in the same age group. ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... October 12, 2015 , ... According to an article published September ... an efficient way to save money on the healthcare needs of patients across the ... patients, house call visits can often effectively eliminate the need to go in and ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... October 12, 2015 , ... According to an article published ... San Antonio, Texas recommended that any high-rises in the city limits that do not ... forward. The article explains that it wasn’t until 1982 that the city started requiring ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... , ... October 12, 2015 , ... The Horizon Foundation ... initiatives focused on improving public health and enhancing the quality of life in the ... to 11 New Jersey non-profit organizations. , The charitable arm of Horizon Blue ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2015)... , Oct. 12, 2015 Zimmer Biomet ... third quarter 2015 sales and earnings conference call will ... 29, 2015, at 8 a.m. Eastern Time.  A news ... at 7:30 a.m. Eastern Time the morning of the ... archived for replay following the conference call. --> ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... PARK, Calif. , Oct. 12, 2015 ... R&D and Chief Scientific Officer of Asterias ... biotechnology company in the emerging field of ... Dealmakers webcast, sponsored in part by Asterias ... Dr. Lebkowski will discuss the progress to ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... , Oct. 12, 2015 This study focuses ... and company profiles. In the two past decades, the industry ... of the manufacturing capabilities and rising consumer consumptions in ... society and economy. China is ... products. Far outpacing other economies in the world, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: