Navigation Links
USC scientist's revolutionary drug pump draws NSF support
Date:11/2/2011

Last month, for the first time in 11 years, USC Associate Professor Ellis Meng found herself raising her hand and asking questions in the classroom not answering them.

Meng, whose research at USC focuses on developing a tiny, implantable medication-delivery system, is enrolled in a business crash-course sponsored by the National Science Foundation, learning how to understand customers, develop viable business models, and get on the fast track to becoming a commercial product.

She was selected to receive the NSF's new Innovation Corps award. The award is designed to help researchers get innovative ideas out of the lab and into the real world.

"It's supposed to kick-start the effort," said Meng, who teaches biomedical and electrical engineering at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering.

A couple weeks ago, she and her team flew to Stanford University to attend a three-day business bootcamp.

"We were sort of fed through the firehose," Meng said. Now back in Los Angeles, she is continuing her education online. In December, Meng's team and 20 others that have been selected by the NSF will pitch their products and newly developed business strategies for marketing them to a room full of potential investors.

Meng's team was among the NSF's first cohort to receive the six-month, $50,000 award.

Each team includes a principle investigator, a student or post doc, and an industry mentor. Meng is working with Christian Gutierrez, a recent Viterbi PhD graduate; Tuan Hoang, a Viterbi lecturer; and Carol Christopher, an industry expert and mentor.

She joked that the program is designed to "help you fail quickly" that is, to spend a minimum of time and resources figuring out whether a product being developed by a researcher has a potential to succeed commercially in a specific market, or whether it needs to be applied to a different market or reimagined.

The course has already offered useful insights into Meng's drug delivery pump, which is designed to address chronic conditions that require long term, localized use of drugs such as cancer, epilepsy, and chronic pain.

Because of its tiny size smaller in diameter than a dime, and as thick as a short stack of quarters the pump can also be used in animal studies, unlike older designs.

Currently, similar pumps are bulky, which makes them difficult to implant inconspicuously, particularly in children. Meng's pump enjoys a much better volume efficiency, meaning that the bulk of the device is taken up by the medication it delivers, as opposed to complicated mechanical pumps or batteries.

Part of that is due to the fact that the pump does not require large batteries it is the first drug pump that can be powered up and operated wirelessly. With the I-Corps award, Meng hopes to see her invention realized as a commercial product soon.

"The timing was perfect," she said. "I'm happy that the NSF is so forward thinking and pioneered a program like this. Through this effort, we can work together to make sure technologies are not orphaned in the laboratory."


'/>"/>

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Jefferson scientists deliver toxic genes to effectively kill pancreatic cancer cells
2. Scientists identify novel inhibitor of human microRNA
3. Argonne scientists peer into heart of compound that may detect chemical, biological weapons
4. MU scientists go green with gold, distribute environmentally friendly nanoparticles
5. Scientists identify gene that may contribute to improved rice yield
6. Scientists discover why a mothers high-fat diet contributes to obesity in her children
7. MU scientists see how HIV matures into an infection
8. Earth scientists keep an eye on Texas
9. Thinking it through: Scientists call for policy to guide biofuels industry toward sustainability
10. Scientists identify a molecule that coordinates the movement of cells
11. Scientists Find new migratory patterns for Mediterranean and Western Atlantic bluefin tuna
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/4/2017)... 4, 2017   EyeLock LLC , a leader ... United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued ... linking of an iris image with a face image ... the company,s 45 th issued patent. ... timely given the multi-modal biometric capabilities that have recently ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... CHICAGO , March 29, 2017  higi, the ... ecosystem in North America , today ... Partners and the acquisition of EveryMove. The new investment ... extensive set of tools to transform population health activities ... and lifestyle data. higi collects and secures ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... March 23, 2017 The report "Gesture Recognition and Touchless ... and Geography - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is ... of 29.63% between 2017 and 2022. Continue Reading ... ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Frederick Innovative Technology Center, Inc. (FITCI), a ... recently earned a $77,518 grant from the Rural Maryland Council (RMC) to support ... Frederick’s first incubator. A non-profit corporation, FITCI is a public-private partnership of the ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... -- Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY ) ... prevention of migraine at the American Academy of Neurology ... 2017, in Boston . ... safety and patient outcomes data for galcanezumab in patients ... monthly migraine headache days among patients with episodic migraine. ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... ... 20, 2017 , ... NetDimensions appoints Bill Mastin, a learning technology veteran, as ... experience in the learning technologies industry, Mastin joins NetDimensions from the New York office ... (LTG). At LEO, Mastin served as SVP of the North America offices and prior ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 20, 2017 , ... Parallel6™ ... clinical trials worldwide, announced today that they were named one of the 2017 ... covers the latest developments in the pharmaceutical industry. , “We take pride in honoring ...
Breaking Biology Technology: