Navigation Links
Tuberculosis genomes portray secrets of pathogen's success
Date:8/21/2013

MADISON, Wis. By any measure, tuberculosis (TB) is a wildly successful pathogen. It infects as many as two billion people in every corner of the world, with a new infection of a human host estimated to occur every second.

Now, thanks to a new analysis of dozens of tuberculosis genomes gathered from around the world, scientists are getting a more detailed picture of why TB is so prevalent and how it evolves to resist countermeasures. Writing today (Aug. 21, 2013) in the journal Public Library of Science (PLoS) Pathogens, a team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher Caitlin Pepperell describes a bacterium that marches in lockstep with human population growth and history, evolving to take advantage of the most crowded and wretched human conditions.

"It's as though the bacterium places bets on human behavior," says Pepperell, formerly of Stanford University, and now a professor of medicine and medical microbiology at UW-Madison. "It always bets that humans will go to war, send people to refugee camps, and gather in miserable places. Historically, that's been a winning bet on the bacterium's part."

The PLoS Pathogens study, whose senior author is Marcus Feldman of Stanford, reveals that tuberculosis experienced a 25-fold expansion worldwide in the 17th century, a time when human populations underwent explosive growth and European exploration of Africa, the Americas, Asia and Oceania was at its peak.

"The timing is coincident with expansion, urbanization and colonial migrations of global human populations," Pepperell explains. "These findings suggest that much of the current TB pandemic has its origins in historical events of the last three centuries."

TB is only transmitted by people, and the organism cannot survive in the environment. It thrives, however, in the crowded conditions of prisons, refugee camps and slums, and TB populations tend to be dominated by the bacteria "lucky" enough to
'/>"/>

Contact: Caitlin Pepperell
cspepper@medicine.wisc.edu
608-262-5983
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Biosignatures distinguish between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis
2. Targeting tuberculosis hotspots could have widespread benefit
3. MIT-designed cooler preserves tuberculosis drugs, records doses
4. Research on improvements in diagnosing and treating tuberculosis
5. Millions of diabetics could die of tuberculosis
6. New approach of resistant tuberculosis
7. Iowa State, Ames Lab researchers study the structure of drug resistance in tuberculosis
8. High doses of Vitamin D help tuberculosis patients recover more quickly
9. Scientists reveal how natural antibiotic kills tuberculosis bacterium
10. Notre Dame research could provide new insights into tuberculosis and other diseases
11. Missing link discovered in the defence mechanism of the tuberculosis pathogen
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/20/2014)... During the past few years, Virginia Tech,s Wu Feng ... Microsoft grant from the "Computing in the Cloud" program, ... a $6 million award from the Air Force on ... from NSF and the National Institutes of Health on ... wove together the "parallel computing" aspects from each grant, ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... of honeybees grows to about 4,000 members, it triggers ... building of a special type of comb used for ... from the Department of Neurobiology and Behaviour at Cornell ... reproductive cycle of honeybee colonies. The results are published ... Nature . , Reproduction isn,t always a honeybee ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... 2014  The second annual Biometrics UnPlugged Executive ... Tampa, Florida on September 15, 2014, ... Technology and Strategy at Samsung, and Philippe de ... of this year,s event is Mobility at the ... "Biometrics UnPlugged: Mobility at the Crossroads of Commerce ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):The internet was delivered to the masses; parallel computing is not far behind 2The internet was delivered to the masses; parallel computing is not far behind 3The internet was delivered to the masses; parallel computing is not far behind 4Worker bees 'know' when to invest in their reproductive future 2Biometrics UnPlugged: Mobility at the Crossroads of Commerce & Privacy to Feature Interactive Sessions with Samsung and Experian 2
... an inherited structural mechanism that can make drugs ... mechanism decreases a protein and in turn causes ... therapies are used to treat patients with childhood ... researchers say their finding advances the field of ...
... may account for many cases of immune deficiency, in ... and Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID), report researchers in the ... to a new diagnostic test for these conditions, which ... unrecognized because of a lack of good tests. , ...
... Broken sewers, flooded industrial plants and dead bodies are all likely ... , But the water - and the muck it is leaving ... as it is unexpected: Toxins common in most urban environments that ... atop the city. , So says a University of Florida professor ...
Cached Biology News:Genomics researchers discover protein deficit that causes drug toxicity 2Protein amplification in melanoma is possible drug target 2Toxic flood lifts lid on common urban pollution problem 2Toxic flood lifts lid on common urban pollution problem 3
(Date:8/20/2014)... SAN JOSE, Calif. , Aug. 20, 2014 ... UCSD highlights the transformative collaboration between the school,s ... (IoT).  As part of the Intel® Software Academic ... between computer sciences and the human body.  ... The study exhibits the work of ...
(Date:8/19/2014)... Shimadzu Scientific Instruments has introduced two ... adding to the company’s extensive line-up of HPLC ... operating environment, and full automation, the i-Series provides ... conventional to ultra-high-speed analysis. , The ... so users can begin building the lab of ...
(Date:8/19/2014)... La Jolla, CA (PRWEB) August 19, 2014 ... the toll Parkinson’s disease can take on an individual. ... tremoring extremities, decreased facial expression, problems swallowing and severe ... due to the dying off of dopamine producing neurons ... retain themselves from a disease that slowly and progressively ...
(Date:8/19/2014)...   Synthetic Biologics, Inc. (NYSE MKT: ... and drug programs targeting specific pathogens that cause ... novel C. difficile development program will ... Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC), September ... Synthetic Biologics, Senior Vice President, Research ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Intel and University of San Diego Bioengineering Department Release Case Study on Health Sciences Research 2Shimadzu’s New i-Series Integrated Liquid Chromatography Systems Provide Laboratories Wider Range of Analytical Capabilities 2Shimadzu’s New i-Series Integrated Liquid Chromatography Systems Provide Laboratories Wider Range of Analytical Capabilities 3As We Mourn Robin Williams’ Passing, His Death Sheds Light on Patients Struggling with Parkinson’s Disease 2As We Mourn Robin Williams’ Passing, His Death Sheds Light on Patients Struggling with Parkinson’s Disease 3Synthetic Biologics Announces Late-Breaking Poster Presentation for C. difficile Program at 54th ICAAC 2Synthetic Biologics Announces Late-Breaking Poster Presentation for C. difficile Program at 54th ICAAC 3Synthetic Biologics Announces Late-Breaking Poster Presentation for C. difficile Program at 54th ICAAC 4
... InterWest Partners,announced today the appointment of ... firm,s Advisory Committee: Caltech,president Dr. Jean-Lou Chameau, ... commissioner Dr. Mark McClellan. The three will ... strategic guidance,to the firm and its portfolio ...
... S. Young awarded "Most Innovative" award by the Association of ... ... Research Inc. (TSX:,ARI), a biotechnology company discovering and developing the ... Young, President,and Chief Executive Officer, received the "Most Innovative" award ...
... to dramatically reduce their dose of these often harsh ... Medicine in St. Louis have taken a step closer ... drug directly on tumors in rabbits using drug-coated nanoparticles. ... than used previously for this purpose markedly slowed tumor ...
Cached Biology Technology:Prestigious Scientific Leaders Join InterWest Advisory Committee 2Prestigious Scientific Leaders Join InterWest Advisory Committee 3Prestigious Scientific Leaders Join InterWest Advisory Committee 4ARIUS recognized for entrepreneurial excellence 2Nanosized technology has supersized effect on tumors 2Nanosized technology has supersized effect on tumors 3
Anti-ACTH Immunogen: Porcine ACTH conjugated to BSA. Available Date: 38566...
Goat polyclonal to BACE1 ( Abpromise for all tested applications). entrezGeneID: 23621 SwissProtID: P56817...
... Immunogen: ... region encompassing the human, mouse, ... Accession Number: ... Assurance: Routinely evaluated by ...
Mouse monoclonal [MN-8C4] to zona radiata ( Abpromise for all tested applications). Antigen: Purified eggshell proteins (zona radiata proteins and small amounts of zona pellucida proteins) from ...
Biology Products: