Navigation Links
Study maps human metabolism in health and disease
Date:3/3/2013

Scientists have produced an instruction manual for the human genome that provides a framework to better understand the relationship between an individual's genetic make-up and their lifestyle.

The international team of researchers say their study published in Nature Biotechnology provides the best model yet to explain why individuals react differently to environmental factors such as diet or medication.

"This research is the second important stage of our understanding of the human genome," said study author Professor Pedro Mendes, from The University of Manchester's School of Computer Science. "If the sequencing of the human genome provided us with a list of the biological parts then our study explains how these parts operate within different individuals.

"The results provide a framework that will lead to a better understanding of how an individual's lifestyle, such as diet, or a particular drug they may require is likely to affect them according to their specific genetic characteristics. The model takes us an important step closer to what is termed 'personalised medicine', where treatments are tailored according to the patient's genetic information."

The research, which involved scientists from Manchester, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Reykjavik, San Diego, Berlin and others, mapped 65 different human cell types and half of the 2,600 enzymes that are known drug targets in order to produce the network model.

Co-author Douglas Kell, Chief Executive of Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and Professor of Bioanalytical Science at the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, said: "To understand the behaviour of a system one must have a model of it. By converting our biological knowledge into a mathematical model format, this work provides a freely accessible tool that will offer an in-depth understanding of human metabolism and its key role in many major human diseases.

"This study offers the most complete model of the human metabolic network available to date to help analyse and test predictions about the physiological and biochemical properties of human cells."

Dr Nicolas Le Novre, from the Babraham Institute in Cambridge (UK), said: "This is a model that links the smallest molecular scale to the full cellular level. It contains more than 8,000 molecular species and 7,000 chemical reactions no single researcher could have built this alone. Having large collaborations like these, using open standards and data-sharing resources, is crucial for systems biology."


'/>"/>

Contact: Aeron Haworth
aeron.haworth@manchester.ac.uk
44-771-788-1563
University of Manchester
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Volcanic aerosols, not pollutants, tamped down recent Earth warming, says CU-Boulder study
2. Study provides insights into plant evolution
3. New study reveals how sensitive US East Coast regions may be to ocean acidification
4. CETS offers new method to help simplify the study of brain pathologies
5. New study could explain why some people get zits and others dont
6. Global tipping point not backed by science: Study
7. Study led by NUS researchers proves the existence of 3 overstretched DNA structures
8. Wayne State study shows airborne dust in urban areas impacts lead levels in children
9. Georgia Physicians Study Published in The Journal of Urology
10. New study shows continued decline in the last remaining stronghold for leatherback sea turtles
11. Study finds maize in diets of people in coastal Peru dates to 5,000 years ago
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/5/2016)... 5, 2016  The Office of Justice Programs, ... CT Scans Enhance or Replace Medico Legal Autopsies?" ... supporting or replacing forensic autopsies with postmortem X-ray ... In response to recommendations made by The ... CT scans as a potential component of medicolegal ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... , Nov. 30, 2016 Not many of us realize that we ... of recovery so we need to do it well. Inadequate sleep levels have been ... blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, and even cancer. Maybe now is the best ... that could help them to manage their sleep quality? ... ...
(Date:11/29/2016)... Lithuania , Nov. 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... biometric identification and object recognition technologies, today ... (SDK) for fingerprint recognition solutions that run ... a fingerprint template using less than 128KB ... in compact devices that have limited on-board ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/6/2016)... , ... December 06, 2016 ... ... the Almac Group, the world’s largest privately-held contract pharmaceutical development and manufacturing ... Health, a leading biopharma outsourcing company combining a leading CRO and the ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... Symbios Technologies, Inc. , ... company has engaged in a collaborative research partnership with Colorado State University (CSU) ... of the Vice President for Research. This agreement is designed to further the ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... -- Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE and SIX: ... of its previously-announced cash tender offers (the "Offers") ... accrued and unpaid interest to, but not including, ... expenses related to the Offers) (the "Maximum Tender ... table below (collectively, the "Notes"). The terms and ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... ... management solutions headquartered in Aurora, Ohio, announced the opening of their new office ... the newly constructed facility is home to 200 employees focused on providing sales, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: