Navigation Links
Stem cells restore sight in mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa
Date:2/24/2010

NEW YORK (February 24, 2010) An international research team led by Columbia University Medical Center successfully used mouse embryonic stem cells to replace diseased retinal cells and restore sight in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. This strategy could potentially become a new treatment for retinitis pigmentosa, a leading cause of blindness that affects approximately one in 3,000 to 4,000 people, or 1.5 million people worldwide. The study appears online ahead of print in the journal Transplantation (March 27, 2010 print issue).

Specialized retinal cells called the retinal pigment epithelium maintain vision. Retinitis pigmentosa results from the death of retinal cells on the periphery of the retina, leading to "tunnel vision," where the field of vision is narrowed considerably and everything outside the "tunnel" appears blurred or wavy.

"This research is promising because we successfully turned stem cells into retinal cells, and these retinal cells restored vision in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa," said Stephen Tsang, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of ophthalmology, pathology and cell biology, Columbia University Medical Center, and lead author of the paper. "The transplanted cells not only looked like retinal cells, but they functioned like them, too."

In Dr. Tsang's study, sight was restored in one-fourth of the mice that received the stem cells. However, complications of benign tumors and retinal detachments were seen in some of the mice, so Dr. Tsang and colleagues will optimize techniques to decrease the incidence of these complications in human embryonic stem cells before testing in human patients can begin.

"Once the complication issues are addressed, we believe this technique could become a new therapeutic approach for not only retinitis pigmentosa, but age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt disease, and other forms of retinal disease that also feature loss of retinal cells," said Dr. Tsa
'/>"/>

Contact: Elizabeth Streich
eas2125@columbia.edu
212-305-6535
Columbia University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Synthetic lethality: A new way to kill cancer cells
2. Unpacking condensins function in embryonic stem cells
3. How nerve cells grow
4. UCR researcher identifies mechanism malaria parasite uses to spread among red blood cells
5. Transforming skin cells into stem cells using a molecular toolkit
6. Lifes smallest motor, cargo carrier of the cells, moves like a seesaw
7. Induced neural stem cells: Not quite ready for prime time
8. Biologists image birth of blood-forming stem cells in embryo
9. Research team targets self-cannibalizing cancer cells
10. Communication breakdown: what happens to nerve cells in Parkinsons disease
11. Cells can read damaged DNA without missing a beat
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/23/2014)... Tracking of blue whales by satellite over a 15-year ... whales consistently return to feed in specific locations each ... in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by ... data may be used to mitigate human threats to ... has been slow to recover since the establishment of ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... cystic fibrosis patients, scientists at the UNC School of ... that a new CF drug counteracts the intended beneficial ... published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine ... and loses its ability to function properly when in ... several insights into how novel CF pharmacotherapies could be ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... , , , , , ... , , , , ... diseases and extend healthy lifespan. The idea, they argue, would be to target the... , , ... , , , , , ... , , , , , , , Medicine ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Blue whales' dangerous feeding grounds 2UNC researchers find unsuspected characteristics of new CF drugs, offering potential paths to more effective therapies 2UNC researchers find unsuspected characteristics of new CF drugs, offering potential paths to more effective therapies 3UNC researchers find unsuspected characteristics of new CF drugs, offering potential paths to more effective therapies 4Strategy proposed for preventing diseases of aging 2Strategy proposed for preventing diseases of aging 3Strategy proposed for preventing diseases of aging 4Strategy proposed for preventing diseases of aging 5
... several proteins in mice that might act as biomarkers ... step to finding a more reliable way to detect ... teenagers use illegally to boost muscle and reduce fat. ... San Francisco today, scientists John Kopchick and Juan Ding ...
... the White House must be enhanced so that the ... nationfrom energy and the environment, to national security, and ... collaborate internationally. The report,s primary recommendations are that: ... respected leader to be Assistant for Science and Technology ...
... 2008 Mary Tyler Moore, the Juvenile Diabetes Research ... M.D., presented the sixth annual "Excellence in Clinical Research ... annual conference today in Washington, DC. The recipients ... director of the JDRF Gene Therapy Center for Diabetes ...
Cached Biology News:Scientists find potential protein biomarkers for growth hormone 2White House science office needs upgrade 2White House science office needs upgrade 3Florida researchers receive JDRF 'Excellence in Clinical Research Award' 2
(Date:7/22/2014)... July 21, 2014 (PRWEB) July 23, 2014 ... at Rutgers University. , The goal of ... across the full spectrum of scientists working in ... and development topics that represent the most promising ... programmed to:,     Provide faculty and ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... WASHINGTON D.C., June 22, 2014 Even within a phylum ... fly is distinguished among other arthropods for its cruelty -- ... and Central America, the fly is a most predatory sort ... male cricket, deposits a smear of larvae, and leaves its ... inside out. , None of this would be possible ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... Vibrate a solution of rod-shaped metal nanoparticles in water ... like tiny drill bits. Why? No one yet knows ... and Technology (NIST) have clocked their speedand it,s fast. ... rotate 10 times faster than any nanoscale object submerged ... dizzying rate has opened up the possibility that they ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... , July 22, 2014   BioTE ... therapy using natural, bio-identical hormone pellets, today announced ... MD to the company.   Dr. Rouzier is joining ... physician.      Dr. Rouzier was residency ... UCLA and is a board certified emergency physician ...
Breaking Biology Technology:The 2014 NJ Symposium on Biomaterials Science Earns Society for Biomaterials Endorsement 2Fly-inspired sound detector 2Fly-inspired sound detector 3Fly-inspired sound detector 4NIST shows ultrasonically propelled nanorods spin dizzyingly fast 2Dr. Neal Rouzier Joins BioTE Medical 2Dr. Neal Rouzier Joins BioTE Medical 3
... work showing how nanowires carved in impurity-laden diamond ... developed a scalable manufacturing process to craft arrays ... photon control. The development supports efforts to ... stage for diamond-based microchips. Additionally, the technology ...
... 2011 Applied Precision is proud to announce ... super-resolution microscopy system at McGill University in Montreal, ... is a super-resolution microscope utilizing proven three-dimensional structured ... in volume resolution and outstanding widefield imaging capabilities. ...
... Ohio, Oct. 18, 2011 Minimally Invasive Devices, Inc ... new product, FloShield PLUS , utilizing the novel Flo-X ... of the end of the laparoscope without removal from the ... MID,s FloShield laparoscopic visualization system. In the first 19 FloShield ...
Cached Biology Technology:Diamonds, silver and the quest for single photons 2Diamonds, silver and the quest for single photons 3Applied Precision Announces the 25th Installation of Its DeltaVision OMX Super-Resolution Microscope at McGill University 2