Navigation Links
Scientists discover a new player in innate immune response
Date:1/16/2008

All multicellular animals have an innate immune system: When bacteria, parasites or fungi invade the organism, small protein molecules are released that eliminate the attackers. Scientists of the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) have now discovered a new molecule that plays an important role in triggering the innate immune response of the fruit fly Drosophila, mice and even humans. Their work has just been published in the journal Nature Immunology.

The cells of the innate immune system recognize hostile invaders with the aid of receptors on their surface: The moment these receptors recognize a foreign structure, they send a message, via a complicated signaling pathway, into the cells interior. The cell then releases immunologically active proteins. The components of this signaling pathway have been conserved surprisingly well through evolution; the various signaling molecules are very similar from fly to man, both in structure and in function.

A group of scientists headed by Dr. Michael Boutros of the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ), collaborating with colleagues of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in Strasbourg, made use of this fact: Using the Nobel-prize winning method of RNA interference (RNAi), they switched off individual molecules of the signaling pathway in Drosophila and have thus come across a new member: Akirin, meaning "making things clear" in Japanese. When they suppressed Akirin production in the immune cells of the flies, these were significantly more susceptible to bacterial infections. And when they knocked down the protein in all body cells, the fly larvae died in an early stage. Colleagues at Japan's Osaka University investigated the corresponding mouse Akirin: In mice, too, the protein fulfills the same function as in the fruit fly and in man.

"What is called the NF-B signaling pathway plays an important role in inflammations, and inflammations are highly relevant in cancer development," said Michael Boutros. "Therefore, the search is on for small molecules that can inhibit this signaling pathway." First inhibitors acting against other links in the signaling chain are already being tested in clinical trials. "The more links of this chain we know, the more possibilities we have to interfere with it," said Boutros explaining the aim of his work.


'/>"/>

Contact: Stefanie Seltmann
s.seltmann@dkfz.de
49-622-142-2854
Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists study the link between childrens nutrition and adult diseases
2. Scientists associate 6 new genetic variants with heart disease risk factor
3. CSHL scientists identify cells that promote formation of lethal lung metastases
4. Smithsonian scientists highlight environmental impacts of biofuels
5. Scientists find missing evolutionary link using tiny fungus crystal
6. Jefferson scientists studying the effects of high-dose vitamin C on non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients
7. Five young Hebrew University scientists win first competitive EU grants
8. Scientists find good news about methane bubbling up from the ocean floor
9. International scientists tackle obstacles to treating brain disorders
10. UC Irvine scientists find new way to sort stem cells
11. Top scientists meet for global conference on stem cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/3/2017)... , April 3, 2017  Data captured ... engineering platform, detected a statistically significant association ... prior to treatment and objective response of ... potential to predict whether cancer patients will ... treatment, as well as to improve both pre-infusion ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017  higi, the health ... in North America , today announced ... and the acquisition of EveryMove. The new investment and ... set of tools to transform population health activities through ... lifestyle data. higi collects and secures data ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global ... to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Biometric Vehicle Access System Market ... the next decade to reach approximately $1,580 million by 2025. ... for all the given segments on global as well as regional ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... ComplianceOnline’s Medical Device Summit is back for its ... 2018 in San Francisco, CA. The Summit brings together current and former FDA office ... directors and government officials from around the world to address key issues in device ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... 11, 2017 , ... A new study published in Fertility ... fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF) transfer cycles. The multi-center matched cohort ... After comparing the results from the fresh and frozen transfer cohorts, the authors ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... 10, 2017 , ... Dr. Bob Harman, founder and CEO of VetStem ... The event entitled “Stem Cells and Their Regenerative Powers,” was held ... Harman, DVM, MPVM was joined by two human doctors: Peter B. Hanson, M.D., Chief ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... , Oct. 9, 2017  BioTech Holdings ... mechanism by which its ProCell stem cell therapy ... limb ischemia.  The Company, demonstrated that treatment with ... of limbs saved as compared to standard bone ... molecule HGF resulted in reduction of therapeutic effect.  ...
Breaking Biology Technology: