Navigation Links
SUMO wrestling cells reveal new protective mechanism target for stroke
Date:5/17/2013

Scientists investigating the interaction of a group of proteins in the brain responsible for protecting nerve cells from damage have identified a new target that could increase cell survival.

The discovery, made by researchers from the University's School of Biochemistry and published in the EMBO journal with additional comment in Nature Reviews, could eventually lead to new therapies for stroke and other brain diseases.

The research builds on earlier work by the team which identified a protein, known as SUMO, responsible for controlling the chemical processes which reduce or enhance protection mechanisms for nerve cells in the brain. The team's latest work has now identified the key role that SUMO plays in promoting cell survival.

During cell stress a protein response triggers a protective mechanism that allows cell adaptation and survival. This process, known as SUMOylation, involves the attachment of a small protein called Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier (SUMO) to target proteins. This pathway is essential for survival of all plant and animal cells because it regulates how proteins interact with each other and can protect nerve cells against damage.

The findings have shown that SUMOylation of a protein called dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is particularly important because it controls the release of chemical signals from mitochondria that instruct the cell to die in a process called apoptosis.

SUMOylation of Drp1 reduces mitochondrial release of these 'death' signals and helps nerve cells survive toxic insults associated with stroke. In the future, finding effective methods to enhance SUMOylation of Drp1 may also be beneficial for cell survival in other diseases including heart attacks and Alzheimer's disease.

The European Research Council-funded study, entitled 'SENP3-mediated deSUMOylation of dynamin-related protein 1 promotes cell death following ischaemia' published in the EMBO Journal and led by Professor Jeremy Henley from the University's School of Biochemistry.


'/>"/>

Contact: Caroline Clancy
caroline.clancy@bristol.ac.uk
44-011-792-88086
University of Bristol
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Tortoise and the hare: New drug stops rushing cancer cells, slow and steady healthy cells unharmed
2. Stem cells can repair a damaged cornea
3. Scientists produce eye structures from human blood-derived stem cells
4. Study demonstrates cells can acquire new functions through transcriptional regulatory network
5. Epigenetic signatures direct the repair potential of reprogrammed cells
6. Researchers print live cells with a standard inkjet printer
7. Nanopills release drugs directly from the inside of cells
8. Protein jailbreak helps breast cancer cells live
9. Newly found protein helps cells build tissues
10. BU researchers derive purified lung and thyroid progenitors from embryonic stem cells
11. Housekeeping mechanism for brain stem cells discovered
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/19/2016)... , UAE, April 20, 2016 ... implemented as a compact web-based "all-in-one" system solution for ... biometric fingerprint reader or the door interface with integration ... modern access control systems. The minimal dimensions of the ... readers into the building installations offer considerable freedom of ...
(Date:4/13/2016)... 13, 2016  IMPOWER physicians supporting Medicaid patients in ... new clinical standard in telehealth thanks to a new ... higi platform, IMPOWER patients can routinely track key health ... mass index, and, when they opt in, share them ... to a local retail location at no cost. By ...
(Date:3/23/2016)... , March 23, 2016 ... Interesse erhöhter Sicherheit Gesichts- und Stimmerkennung mit ... Inc. (NASDAQ: MESG ), ein ... dass das Unternehmen mit SpeechPro zusammenarbeitet, um ... der Finanzdienstleistungsbranche, wird die Möglichkeit angeboten, im ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... 04, 2016 , ... Nutrafol®, a first-to-market smart-supplement for healthy ... stress related hair loss. With patent-pending formulas for both female hair loss and ... the medical and salon channels nationwide. , Dermatologists, Plastic Surgeons and hair ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... of Dr. Nancy Gillett to its Board of Directors. Dr. Gillett recently retired ... Corporate Executive Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer. A board-certified veterinary pathologist, Dr. ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... York, NY (PRWEB) , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... Hill Hospital , for definitive prostate cancer treatment, patients traditionally had two main treatment ... appropriate treatment plan would be made. , New technology has enabled doctors to ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... F.E.E.D. Co., the Feline ... their revolutionary, veterinarian-designed product for indoor cats. The NoBowl Feeding System replaces the ... food the way nature intended. NoBowls make cats happy and healthy. , Since ...
Breaking Biology Technology: