Navigation Links
Reduced bone density, stunted growth in turtles exposed to common chemical
Date:11/16/2011

COLUMBIA, Mo. Manufactured until 1977, and banned by the Environmental Protection Agency in 1979, pentachlorobiphenyls (PCBs) are chemicals still commonly found in the environment because they break down slowly. Now, a husband and wife research team at the University of Missouri and Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., have found that exposure to one of the chemicals has effects on growth and bone density in turtles. This knowledge could lead to insights on PCBs effects on humans and the environment.

"Turtles also are known as an 'indicator species' because they are often used as a gauge for the health of an entire ecosystem," said Dawn Holliday, co-researcher and assistant professor of biology at Westminster College in Fulton, Mo. "By finding the effects of PCBs on turtles, we can understand possible effects the chemicals might have on humans."

Researchers studied PCB 126, a version of the chemical compound once used in pesticides and electric transformers. PCBs are absorbed by eating exposed animals or drinking exposed water and are stored in fat cells. PCBs can affect the endocrine system and, thus, the regulation of hormones that control growth and other body functions.

Scientists know that people harbor PCBs in many tissues; however, little is known about the effect the chemicals have on people. Dawn Holliday said previous research on people accidentally exposed to the chemical through spills or accidents has shown correlations between exposure and stunted growth in humans.

"By studying the effect of PCB exposure on turtles, we can better understand how PCB exposure impacts people," said Casey Holliday, co-researcher and assistant professor of anatomy in the MU School of Medicine. "People are high on the food chain, and thus more susceptible to accumulation of PCBs. Smaller animals ingest PCBs. As large animals eat these smaller animals, the chemical stays in the food chain, as it is deposited in fat cells and doesn't leave the body. Even people not directly exposed to extreme amounts of PCB may see effects; this research will help us understand these effects better."

In the study, the researchers examined Diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) that were exposed to an amount of PCB 126 that was equivalent to the exposure the reptiles would experience in an urban aquatic environment, such as the mid-Atlantic's Chesapeake Bay or Louisiana's wetlands. The turtles were exposed to the chemical for six months, and were compared to a group of unexposed turtles kept in the same laboratory. Exposed turtles were smaller, had more juvenile features, and lower bone density. In a previous study, Dawn Holliday found that PCB-exposed turtles had a lower metabolic rate.

The changes have an effect on the way the turtles function. When diving for long periods of time, turtles stored calcium in their shells to help maintain a normal physiological state while they hold their breath. Lower bone density means less calcium, possibly resulting in a reduced ability to stay underwater for very long. Additionally, turtles with low bone density may produce eggs with thinner shells, leaving them more susceptible to predators. Lower density may result in a softer shell, enabling more predators to eat turtles. Affected turtles may also have difficulty eating hard prey, such as crabs, because the reptiles have smaller, weaker jaws and cannot easily crack shells.

The study was published in Aquatic Toxicology.


'/>"/>

Contact: Christian Basi
BasiC@missouri.edu
573-882-4430
University of Missouri-Columbia
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Gene regulatory protein is reduced in bipolar disorder
2. Aquarium fishes are more aggressive in reduced environments, a new study finds
3. Vitamin D deficiency associated with reduced lung function
4. Identifying factors in atrazines reduced weed control
5. Combination therapy reduced HER2-positive breast cancers
6. More than 1,000 tigers reduced to skin and bones in last decade
7. Chefs can create reduced-calorie restaurant foods
8. Coastal creatures may have reduced ability to fight off infections in acidified oceans
9. U-M study achieves reduced side effects in head and neck cancer treatment
10. Study: Carbon monoxide exposure can be reduced during routine anesthesia in kids
11. How can accidental captures of loggerhead turtles be reduced?
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Reduced bone density, stunted growth in turtles exposed to common chemical
(Date:6/15/2016)... 2016 Transparency Market Research ... Market by Application Market - Global Industry Analysis Size Share ... the report, the  global gesture recognition market  was ... is estimated to grow at a CAGR of ... Increasing application of gesture recognition technology ...
(Date:6/2/2016)... LONDON , June 2, 2016 ... has awarded the 44 million US Dollar project, ... Security Embossed Vehicle Plates including Personalization, Enrolment, and IT Infrastructure ... world leader in the production and implementation of Identity Management ... in January, however Decatur was selected ...
(Date:5/20/2016)... -- VoiceIt is excited to announce its new marketing ... working together, VoiceIt and VoicePass will offer an ... slightly different approaches to voice biometrics, collaboration between ... Both companies ... "This marketing and technology partnership allows VoiceIt ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... June, 23, 2016  The Biodesign Challenge (BDC), a ... ways to harness living systems and biotechnology, announced its ... in New York City . ... students, showcased projects at MoMA,s Celeste Bartos Theater during ... , MoMA,s senior curator of architecture and design, and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Apellis Pharmaceuticals, ... 1 clinical trials of its complement C3 inhibitor, ... and multiple ascending dose studies designed to assess ... of subcutaneous injection in healthy adult volunteers. ... either as a single dose (ranging from 45 ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... quality, regulatory and technical consulting, provides a free webinar on Performing ... July 13, 2016 at 12pm CT at no charge. , Incomplete investigations are ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... June 22, 2016 Research and Markets has ... report to their offering. ... 2014 from $29.3 billion in 2013. The market is expected to ... from 2015 to 2020, increasing from $50.6 billion in 2015 to ... forecasts during the forecast period (2015 to 2020) are discussed. As ...
Breaking Biology Technology: