Navigation Links
Putting the spring back in broken hearts
Date:9/23/2013

The threat from a heart attack doesn't end with the event itself. Blockage of blood flow to the heart can cause irreversible cell death and scarring. With transplants scarce, half the people who live through a heart attack die within five years. Scientists are trying to address this problem by engineering cardiac tissue to patch up damaged areas.

Now doctoral students Sharon Fleischer and Ron Feiner under the supervision of Dr. Tal Dvir of Tel Aviv University's Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have fabricated fibers shaped like springs that allow engineered cardiac tissue to pump more like the real thing. They reported their findings in the journal Biomaterials in August.

"Until now, when scientists have tried to engineer cardiac tissue, they've used straight fibers to support the contracting cells," says Dr. Dvir. "However, these fibers prevent the contraction of the engineered tissue. What we did was mimic the spring-like fibers that promote contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle. We found that by growing tissues on these fibers, we got more functional tissues."

Springing into action

Cardiac tissue is engineered by allowing cells taken from the hearts of patients or animals to grow on a three-dimensional scaffold, which replaces the extracellular matrix, a collagen grid that naturally supports the cells in the heart. Over time, the cells come together to form a tissue that generates its own electrical impulses and expands and contracts spontaneously. The tissue can then be surgically implanted to replace damaged tissue and improve heart function in patients.

Dr. Dvir's Laboratory for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine focuses on engineering complex tissues for medical use. When it comes to the heart, the researchers are always looking for ways to build a scaffold that better replicates the extracellular matrix
'/>"/>

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Putting flesh on the bones of ancient fish
2. Kirk, Spock together: Putting emotion, logic into computational words
3. GSA Today: Putting time in its place
4. Putting plants online: 4 leading botanical gardens to create first online catalog of all plants
5. Journal of Control, Automation and Electrical Systems now published by Springer
6. Offspring of mothers stressed during pregnancy with a passive stress coping style more prone to obesity
7. A maternal junk food diet alters development of opioid pathway in the offspring
8. High folate gestational and post-weaning diets in Wistar rat offspring
9. Springer announces impact factor increases for journals in 2012
10. Submarine springs reveal how coral reefs respond to ocean acidification
11. Springer launches French- and Italian-language eBook collections
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:9/30/2014)... German . ... risky situations such as exposure to predators. Researchers from ... a long-term study on different populations of great tits ... ambient temperature. High metabolic rates and low temperatures were ... birds were more likely to approach potential predators. , ...
(Date:9/29/2014)... Clostridium ramosum , coupled with a high-fat diet, may ... week in mBio , the online open-access journal of ... from the German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke in Nuthetal ... ramosum gained weight when fed a high-fat diet. Mice ... obese even when consuming a high-fat diet, and mice that ...
(Date:9/29/2014)... in school? According to a new Food and Brand ... meals can increase participation in the National School Lunch ... of vegetables by 16%! , Chefs Move to Schools ... pairs chefs with schools in order to provide nutrition ... food service workers. , A CMTS event was held ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Risky metabolism 2Gut bacteria promote obesity in mice 2Chefs move to schools can increase school meal participation and vegetable intake among students 2
... food, air and water pathogens may get a lot easier ... University researcher and his team. , Syed Hashsham, an ... and the Center for Microbial Ecology, is developing a portable, ... agents in air, water and food. , "This ...
... patients living with heart failure and other health conditions, blood ... their condition. Often, though, chemical or physiologic changes silently cause ... what if in the future a tiny device, one the ... in the patient to monitor and detect abnormalities, and could ...
... in the thymus, where the immune system's T cells develop, ... body's thousands of proteins as "self." The research confirms ... of the immune system, and not only at the sites ... case of type 1 diabetes, or the joints in rheumatoid ...
Cached Biology News:Professors to develop hand-held pathogen testing device 2Cardiologist's 'living chip' changes science of disease monitoring 2Cardiologist's 'living chip' changes science of disease monitoring 3Cardiologist's 'living chip' changes science of disease monitoring 4Proteins anchor memories in our brain 2Proteins anchor memories in our brain 3
(Date:9/30/2014)... , Sept. 30, 2014 Nematicide ... kill nematodes. Nematodes are microscopic parasitic roundworms, found ... and inside other plants and animals. Nematicides have ... or other properties promoting migration through the soil. ... than 1,000 plant-parasitic nematodes. With more than 10,000 ...
(Date:9/30/2014)... Sept. 30, 2014 CORD:USE Cord Blood Bank ... that it has entered into an Equity and Exclusive ... has licensed a series of patented technologies for the isolation ... clinical applications.  Tianhe is performing Phase I/II clinical trials ... Spain using Tianhe,s Stem Cell Educator Therapy ...
(Date:9/30/2014)... BALTIMORE and ROCKVILLE, Md., Sept. 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... private-public partnership focusing on commercializing market-relevant biohealth innovations and ... Maryland , announced today that venture capitalist, ... as a strategic advisor. Dr. Fernandez will be a ... Gap Fund, which will provide up to $50 million ...
(Date:9/30/2014)... Lyme Research Alliance (LRA), the nation’s ... universities, today announced the awarding of seven grants worth ... cure for Lyme and other tick-borne diseases. , ... its history—over 20 grant proposals—a 100 percent increase from ... receive so many solid applications from talented scientists this ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Nematicides Market by Types (Fumigants, Organophosphates, Carbamate and Bio-Nematicides), Applications (Agrochemicals, Industrial, and Others), and Geography (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific & ROW) - Global Trends & Forecasts to 2019 2CORD:USE is Pleased to Announce it has Partnered with Tianhe Stem Cell Biotechnologies, Developer of Cord Blood Stem Cell Therapy Showing Promising Results in Clinical Trials for the Treatment of Diabetes and Autoimmune Diseases 2CORD:USE is Pleased to Announce it has Partnered with Tianhe Stem Cell Biotechnologies, Developer of Cord Blood Stem Cell Therapy Showing Promising Results in Clinical Trials for the Treatment of Diabetes and Autoimmune Diseases 3CORD:USE is Pleased to Announce it has Partnered with Tianhe Stem Cell Biotechnologies, Developer of Cord Blood Stem Cell Therapy Showing Promising Results in Clinical Trials for the Treatment of Diabetes and Autoimmune Diseases 4Seasoned Life Sciences Venture Capitalist Tania Fernandez Joins BHI to Help Manage New BioHealth Gap Fund 2Lyme Research Alliance Awards Nearly $600,000 in New Grants 2Lyme Research Alliance Awards Nearly $600,000 in New Grants 3Lyme Research Alliance Awards Nearly $600,000 in New Grants 4
... Major advancements in computing performance were developed at ... engineering departments at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... database architectures, grid and cluster computing were some ... department chair, and other faculty last Wednesday at ...
... of Wisconsin announced on Tuesday that it plans to implement ... phases of its research concerning human subjects. Expected to launch ... a long-range plan to fully enhance the institution's Institutional Review ... volume of research, as the Medical College of Wisconsin ...
... will lead 21 state colleges in trying to encourage ... engineering and math, the university has announced. , ,The ... two-year colleges from around the state. The Louis ... National Science Foundation, contributed a $2.5 million grant to ...
Cached Biology Technology:UW computer scientists tout achievements and explain industry shortcomings 2UW computer scientists tout achievements and explain industry shortcomings 3Medical College of Wisconsin to automate its processes for human subject testing 2