Navigation Links
Notre Dame study finds Asian carp DNA not widespread in the Great Lakes
Date:4/4/2013

Scientists from the University of Notre Dame, The Nature Conservancy, and Central Michigan University have presented their findings of Asian carp DNA throughout the Great Lakes in a study published in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.

"The good news is that we have found no evidence that Asian carp are widespread in the Great Lakes basin, despite extensive surveys in Southern Lake Michigan and parts of lakes Erie and St Clair," Christopher Jerde, the paper's lead author and a scientist at the University of Notre Dame, said. "Looking at the overall patterns of detections we remain convinced that the most likely source of Asian carp DNA is live fish."

Some recent reports regarding environmental DNA have suggested that birds, boats, and other pathways, but not live fish, are spreading the bighead and silver carp DNA.

"It's really very telling that the only places DNA has been recovered are where Asian carp have been captured," Jerde points out. "If birds or boats were commonly spreading the DNA, then we should be detecting DNA in other places we have surveyed in the Great Lakes."

According to the USGS, in 2010 commercial fishermen captured a 20 lb. bighead carp in Lake Calumet, 30 miles above the electric barrier meant to block the advancing carp from the Illinois River. Lake Calumet is 7 miles of river away from Lake Michigan. Likewise, in 1995 and twice in 2000, USGS records indicate that bighead carp were captured in the western basin of Lake Erie.

"It shouldn't be surprising that we found evidence of Asian carp in these areas where Asian carp were already known to exist from captures," Lindsay Chadderton, co-author on the paper and Director of The Nature Conservancy's Great Lakes Aquatic Invasive Species program, said.

This study builds upon a growing area of research to find invasive species when they are at low abundance and when they can be potentially managed.

"Catching these fish by net, hook, or electrofishing is ineffective when the fish are at low abundance that's why we were asked to deploy this eDNA approach in the first place," David Lodge, director of the University of Notre Dame's Environmental Change Initiative and author on the paper, said. "If we wait for the tell-tale signs of Asian carp jumping out of the water, then we are likely too late to prevent the damages. Environmental DNA allows for us to detect their presence before the fish become widespread."

"When we first discovered DNA from Asian carp at the Calumet Harbor and Port of Chicago, we were concerned that Asian carp may already be widespread in the Great Lakes," Andrew Mahon, co-author and assistant professor at Central Michigan University, said . "But because of our collaborations with State and Federal partners, we now have a better picture of the Asian carp distribution, and we are optimistic that with continued vigilance, it will be possible to prevent Asian carp becoming established in the Great Lakes."


'/>"/>

Contact: Christopher Jerde
cjerde@nd.edu
574-217-0267
University of Notre Dame
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Notre Dame researcher is studying role small dams play in pollution control
2. Notre Dame researchers are using new technologies to combat invasive species
3. Notre Dame research may have important implications for combating diabetes
4. Cargill expands support of Notre Dame Haiti Program
5. Notre Dame research reveals migrating Great Lakes salmon carry contaminants upstream
6. Notre Dame research could improve sustainability and cost effectiveness of wastewater treatment
7. Notre Dame research could provide new insights into tuberculosis and other diseases
8. Notre Dame researcher is shedding light on how jaws evolve
9. Notre Dame establishes professorships in adult stem cell research
10. Notre Dame researchers using novel method to combat malaria drug resistance
11. New paper by Notre Dame researchers describes method for cleaning up nuclear waste
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/3/2016)... Calif. , March 3, 2016  FlexTech, a ... the categories of Innovation, Research & Development, Leadership in ... Leadership. This is the 9 th year of ... group of companies and individuals from past years ... based on a pre-described set of criteria, by a ...
(Date:3/2/2016)... DUBLIN , March 2, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... has announced the addition of the  "Global ... to their offering.  ,     (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769) , ... sector to grow at a CAGR of ... http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/wzwqtz/global_biometrics ) has announced the addition ...
(Date:3/1/2016)... -- (RSAC Booth #3041) – True fraud costs business $9 ... lost to false positives, where good customers are pushed ... the RSA Conference 2016, NuData Security is calling for a ... devaluing the data fraudsters have in abundance in favor ... --> --> Cheap and readily available ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... medicine, is excited to announce the launch of the Proove Health Foundation ... volunteerism, and education to promote the use of personalized medicine for tackling the ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... KY and San Diego, CA (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 ... ... National Stem Cell Foundation (NSCF) to support the development of a patient-specific stem cell ... Dr. Andrés Bratt-Leal in the lab of Dr. Jeanne Loring at The Scripps Research ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... Q BioMed Inc. (OTCQB:QBIO), ...  was featured in an article he wrote on ... To Tread: http://www.lifescienceleader.com/doc/accelerators-enter-when-vcs-fear-to-tread-0001 ... an essential business journal for life science executives ... Big Pharmas. Their content is designed to inform ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Morris Midwest ( http://www.morrismidwest.com ... regional manufacturers at its Maple Grove, Minnesota technical center, May 11-12. The ... Trumpf. Almost 20 leading suppliers of tooling, accessories, software and other related ...
Breaking Biology Technology: