Navigation Links
New hope for treating Alzheimer's Disease: A role for the FKBP52 protein
Date:3/20/2012

New research in humans published today reveals that the so-called FKBP52 protein may prevent the Tau protein from turning pathogenic. This may prove significant for the development of new Alzheimer's drugs and for detecting the disease before the onset of clinical symptoms.

A study published online today in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (1), for the first time demonstrates that the FKBP52 protein, discovered by Prof. Etienne BAULIEU twenty years ago, may prevent hyperphosphorylation of Tau protein, which has been shown to characterise a number of cerebral neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's Disease (AD).

This work has been carried out by Professor Etienne Baulieu and his research team at Inserm (National Institute for medical research in France) with the support of philanthropists who help the Institut Baulieu, based in France.

Limited research exists on Tau and its role in the development of AD, but it is known that many neurodegenerative diseases are characterised by the deposition of pathological hyperphosphorylated forms of Tau protein, into structures known as 'Tau tangles'. The mechanism of Tau toxicity is unclear and there are currently no drug treatments targeting Tau, nor any biomarkers that predict the risk of a future "Tauopathy". Professor Baulieu decided to focus on Tau abnormalities and was the first to discover in 2010, an interaction between Tau, and the FKBP52 protein (2).

The new research takes his previous research to the next level. It demonstrates a direct correlation between high levels of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein and reduced levels of FKBP52, in brain cells from patients who have died following Alzheimer's Disease, compared with normal brain cells. This suggests that FKBP52 could control the aberrant production of pathogenic Tau. When FKBP52 is reduced in the nerve cells of AD patients, pathogenic Tau is free to accumulate and contribute to the degeneration of brain cells.

In conclusion, early measurement of FKBP52 levels could form the basis of a predictive test for Alzheimer's Disease before the onset of clinical symptoms, and new compounds modulating FKBP52's activity could become the next generation of treatments for the disease.

Commenting on this new research, Professor Baulieu said: "There is still a worrying lack of research into the causes of age-related brain disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease and dementia. I founded the Institut Baulieu, with the aim of being able to treat and even prevent these diseases.

Research on Tau has been very limited, and until recently, I was among the few scientists focusing on Tau pathology. The discovery of the FKBP52 protein is the only 'anti-Tau' perspective so far. Its reduced production in the brains of Alzheimer's patients marks a turning point in understanding this complex disease.

I believe it takes us one step closer to developing an effective treatment and possible predictive tests for the increasing number of people who may develop Alzheimer's Disease in our ageing societies."


'/>"/>

Contact: Kristin Shine
KShine@brunswickgroup.com
44-207-404-5959
IOS Press
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New approach to treating cystic fibrosis lung infection shows promise
2. Commercial aquatic plants offer cost-effective method for treating wastewater
3. Pitt research identifies new target in brain for treating schizophrenia
4. UC Davis discovery offers hope for treating kidney cancer
5. World breakthrough in treating premature babies
6. Studies point to novel target for treating arrhythmias
7. Antibody key to treating variant CJD, scientists find
8. New medications show promise in treating drug-resistant prostate cancer
9. NC State researchers find soy may aid in treating canine cancers
10. New drug shows promise in treating drug-resistant prostate cancer
11. Cold and brown fat raise the prospect of a new method of treating obesity
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/23/2017)... The report "Gesture Recognition and Touchless Sensing Market by Technology (Touch-based and Touchless), ... published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to be worth USD 18.98 billion ... Continue Reading ... ...      (Logo: ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... March 21, 2017   Neurotechnology , a ... technologies, today announced the release of the ... provides improved facial recognition using up to 10 ... single computer. The new version uses deep neural-network-based ... and it utilizes a Graphing Processing Unit (GPU) ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 2017 Vigilant Solutions , a vehicle ... agencies, announced today the appointment of retired FBI special ... safety business development. Mr. Sheridan brings more ... a focus on the aviation transportation sector, to his ... Mr. Sheridan served as the Aviation Liaison Agent Coordinator ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/26/2017)... SAN DIEGO, CALIF. (PRWEB) , ... April 26, ... ... Mother’s Day? Lajollacooks4u, San Diego’s premiere team-building and cooking events company, offers ... cooking classes. , Menus specialize in California cuisine, and guests leave inspired ...
(Date:4/26/2017)... Hong Kong (PRWEB) , ... April 26, 2017 ... ... be hosted in EMEA and North America this May ... from May 16-18 , Donald H. Taylor, Chairman of the Learning and Performance ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... L3 ... to announce the company is now a certified iMedNet eClinical and Electronic Data ... enables the company’s clinical research team to build, customize and manage clinical trial ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... , ... April 24, 2017 , ... ... thermal denaturation in a cellular milieu; however, the broad application of this cellular ... simple platforms with sensitive quantitative readouts. Cell-based thermal stabilization assays are valuable methods ...
Breaking Biology Technology: