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New cicada book catalogs all species in USA and Canada
Date:3/17/2013

"The Cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadoidea: Cicadidae) of North America North of Mexico," a new book published by the Entomological Society of America, offers a comprehensive review of the North American cicada fauna and provides information on synonymies, type localities, and type material.

There are 170 species and 21 subspecies of cicadas found in continental North America north of Mexico, and this new book has 211 figures, with each species photographed in color. The hardcover book is 227 pages.

Written by Dr. Allen Sanborn, Department of Biology at Barry University, and Dr. Maxine Heath, retired from the University of Illinois, this book is a valuable resource for anyone interested in the taxonomy of North American cicadas, including musuem curators, zoologists, and students of biodiversity.

"Nothing like this has ever been published concerning the North American cicadas," said Dr. Sanborn. "The book is unique, and it will help museum curators to organize their collections."


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Contact: Alan Kahan
akahan@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America
Source:Eurekalert  

Page: 1

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