Navigation Links
Mouse stem cell study offers new insights into body fat distribution
Date:7/11/2010

New research being presented today (12 July) at the UK National Stem Cell Network Annual Science Meeting in Nottingham shows that adding fat to mouse stem cells grown in the lab affects their response to the signals that push them to develop into one or other of the main types of fat storage cells subcutaneous (under the skin) or visceral (around the organs).

Visceral fat the so-called "pot-belly" indicates a much higher risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes than subcutaneous fat. This discovery will help us to understand the fundamental biology underpinning these two major causes of obesity-related morbidity and mortality in the developed world.

During development, some groups of stem cells will go on to become adipose cells the large globular cells that store and metabolise fats from our diets. This research suggests that the distribution of visceral versus subcutaneous adipose cells is at least in part down to the nutrition available to stem cells during the early stages of development.

The study, led by Professor Kevin Docherty of the University of Aberdeen, found that adding palmitate (a major component in palm oil) to mouse stem cells affected how they responded to androgen and oestrogen - the sex hormones which normally control the types of fat cells that stem cells become.

Professor Docherty said "This finding is an important insight as it suggests that nutrition in early development can affect how and where fat is stored in later life. We've known for a while that having a pot-belly suggests someone's risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease is high, but there is still a lot to learn about why body fat distribution varies so much between people. Our research helps by putting another small piece into the puzzle.

"Type 2 diabetes used to be a disease that struck people in later life, but in the UK and some other developed countries we're seeing a worrying increase of this problem amongst overweight teenagers and younger adults. In the UK, 30% of teenagers are overweight or obese so it's crucial that we understand the fundamental biology of weight-related diseases so that we can develop better ways of preventing, treating and managing this serious problem."

The researchers hope that this study might lead to new insights into how to combat type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Professor Docherty concluded: "The number one way of reducing the number of overweight people is improving diet and encouraging exercise, but we hope our research might eventually offer insights that lead to new treatments including drugs to reduce these high-risk fat stores around organs."


'/>"/>

Contact: Mike Davies
ukpo@uknscn.org
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Anti-cancer drug prevents, reverses cardiovascular damage in mouse model of premature aging disorder
2. Multiple sclerosis research charges ahead with new mouse model of disease
3. Peering inside the skull of a mouse to solve meningitis mystery
4. Salk researchers develop novel glioblastoma mouse model
5. Diminuendo -- New mouse model for understanding cause of progressive hearing loss
6. A worm-and-mouse tale: B cells deserve more respect
7. Brain building: Study shows brain growth tied to cell division in mouse embryos
8. CSHL team develops mouse models of leukemia that predict response to chemotherapy
9. Mouse model provides a new tool for investigators of human developmental disorder
10. A new mouse model provides insight into genetic neurological disorders
11. Caffeic acid inhibits colitis in a mouse model -- is a drug-metabolizing gene crucial?
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:11/30/2016)... Nov. 30, 2016 Not many of us realize that we spend ? ... so we need to do it well. Inadequate sleep levels have been found to ... stroke, diabetes, and even cancer. Maybe now is the best time to ... help them to manage their sleep quality? Continue Reading ... ...
(Date:11/29/2016)... 29, 2016 Nearly one billion matches per second ... ... DERMALOG is Germany's ... efficient Identity Management. (PRNewsFoto/DERMALOG Identification Systems) ... DERMALOG is Germany's largest Multi-Biometric supplier: The company's Fingerprint Identification ...
(Date:11/22/2016)... , Nov. 22, 2016   MedNet Solutions ... the entire spectrum of clinical research, is pleased to ... Medical LiveWire Healthcare and Life Sciences Awards as ... caps off an unprecedented year of recognition and growth ... for over 15 years. iMedNet ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... 2016 AskLinkerReports.com has published a report ... Amyloglucosidase Industry 2016 Market Research Report. From a basic outline ... overview are all covered in the report. This report projects ... analysis of the Amyloglucosidase industry. ... , , ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Dec. 8, 2016  Renova™ Therapeutics, a biotechnology ... failure and type 2 diabetes, announced that it ... adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector developed in the laboratory ... at Stanford University. The company plans to use ... therapy product pipeline. "Early research ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... The ability ... optogenetics — is key to exciting advances in the study and mapping of ... projected via free-space optics stimulates small, transparent organisms and excites neurons within superficial ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... England , December 8, 2016 ... das Unternehmen für Molekulargenetik, erweitert seine Palette an ... myPanel™ NGS Custom FH Panels, das ein schnelles ... (FH) ermöglicht. Das Panel bietet eine Erkennung von ... Variations (CNV) mit einem einzigen kleinen Panel und ...
Breaking Biology Technology: