Navigation Links
Learning from the linker
Date:2/6/2013

Mature cells can be reprogrammed to pluripotency and thus regain the ability to divide and differentiate into specialized cell types. Although these so-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) represent a milestone in stem cell research, many of the biochemical processes that underlie reprogramming are still not understood. Scientists from the EMBL Hamburg and from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine in Mnster, Germany now shed new light on this process. In a study published today in Nature Cell Biology, the scientists describe important details about the structure of the transcription factor Oct4, known to play a crucial role in the reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells. The study broadens the knowledge about the reprogramming of cells and may pave the way for medical applications in the field of regenerative medicine and drug discovery.

The transcription factor Oct4 is a protein that binds to DNA and controls the genes involved in reprogramming the cells. The team at EMBL Hamburg has now been able to resolve the crystal structure of Oct4 using high-intensity X-ray beams. In particular, their analysis focused on a previously unexplored linker sequence between two DNA binding elements of the protein. "The uniqueness of the linker has caught our attention for more than a decade and, thus, we are extremely pleased to see it for the first time, helping us rationalize its function in reprogramming cells to pluripotency" says Matthias Wilmanns who led the work in Hamburg.

The authors suggest that the linker recruits key partners to the Oct4 target genes, without whom the process of reprogramming cannot be completed. Colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine led by Hans Schler supported these findings with studies on the modifications of the linker. They showed that changes in the sequence of the linker led to the loss of Oct4's reprogramming activity, and that a single residue mutation has major effects on the protein interface and thus affects the recruiting of key partners.

"Our work shows how unique the Oct4 interface is and how crucial it is for reprogramming to pluripotency. These are vital steps forward in our understanding of cell reprogramming and could lead us to new applications in the fields of drug discovery and tissue engineering" said Hans Schler. Ongoing research will help determine an integrated picture on how Oct4 acts in the context of many other protein components in stem cell pluripotency.


'/>"/>

Contact: Isabelle Kling
isabelle.kling@embl.de
49-622-138-78355
European Molecular Biology Laboratory
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Majority-biased learning
2. Awake mental replay of past experiences critical for learning
3. Dartmouth researchers are learning how exercise affects the brain
4. Songbirds learning hub in brain offers insight into motor control
5. New Genetics educational resource promotes active learning
6. New model gives hands-on help for learning the secrets of molecules
7. Learning faster with neurodegenerative disease
8. Learning from each other -- growing together
9. Sleep-deprived bees have difficulty relearning
10. Learning a new sense
11. Learning whos the top dog: Study reveals how the brain stores information about social rank
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/30/2017)... , March 30, 2017  On April 6-7, ... Hack the Genome hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters ... two-day competition will focus on developing health and wellness ... Hack the Genome is the first ... tremendous. The world,s largest companies in the genomics, tech ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017  higi, the health ... in North America , today announced ... and the acquisition of EveryMove. The new investment and ... set of tools to transform population health activities through ... lifestyle data. higi collects and secures data ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... The Controller General of Immigration from Maldives Mr. Mohamed Anwar ... prestigious international IAIR Award for the most innovative high security ePassport and ... ... Maldives Immigration Controller General, Mr. Mohamed ... the right) have received the IAIR award for the "Most innovative high ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... 2017 , ... New resistant soybean and cotton cropping systems ... amaranth and other broadleaf weeds resistant to glyphosate. But scientists with the Weed ... known to drift and to cause harm to sensitive, off-target broadleaf plants. , ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... June 15, 2017 , ... The newest ... artist’s journey through creative experimentation and interdisciplinary collaboration. Feature Creep, a solo exhibition ... An opening reception will be held at EKG, located at 3600 Market Street ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... June 15, 2017 , ... DuPont Industrial Biosciences ... be speaking at Bloomberg’s 2017 Sustainable Business Summit: Seattle this Thursday, ... sustainability officials on a panel titled “Developing a Corporate Renewables Strategy.” , ...
(Date:6/14/2017)... ... June 14, 2017 , ... Slone Partners welcomed ... steered by the executive search firm, “Building Value in Precision Medicine: Can We ... of Foundation Medicine, led an open discussion with expert panelists Troy Cox, CEO ...
Breaking Biology Technology: