Navigation Links
'Hot spot' for toxic harmful algal blooms discovered off Washington coast
Date:1/30/2009

A part of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which separates Washington state from Canada's British Columbia, is a potential "hot spot" for toxic harmful algal blooms affecting the Washington and British Columbia coasts.

Marine scientists found that under certain conditions, toxic algal cells from an offshore "initiation site" break off and are transported to nearshore areas, where they may trigger harmful algal blooms that ultimately force the closure of Washington state shellfish beds along beaches.

"Knowing more about these blooms is critical for protecting human and ecosystem health," said David Garrison, director of the National Science Foundation (NSF)'s Biological Oceanography Program, which co-funded the research. "This research is a very successful step toward addressing harmful algal blooms in the U.S."

The study, conducted by a team of scientists from NOAA's Fisheries Service, San Francisco State University and the universities of Washington, Maine and Western Ontario, is part of the interagency Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms Pacific Northwest Program.

"Understanding how and where harmful algal blooms originate will help provide early warnings to protect human health and reduce the impact of biotoxins on coastal shellfisheries," said Vera Trainer, lead author of a paper published in the January issue of the journal Limnology & Oceanography, and a scientist at the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle.

Scientists noted that the Juan de Fuca eddy, a circular water mass rotating some 30 miles off the northern coast of Washington at the mouth of the Juan de Fuca Strait, frequently contained significant populations of the microscopic toxic alga, Pseudo-nitzschia.

Over the course of the five-year study, the researchers took thousands of measurements at sea and conducted experiments onboard research vessels and in their laboratories. They hoped to better understand the factors that initiate and sustain the growth of this toxic alga, and to determine why it produces a deadly biotoxin.

This naturally-produced biotoxin, domoic acid, can accumulate in shellfish, crabs and some fish.

By attacking the nervous system it can cause adverse health effects or death in birds, marine mammals and humans who consume affected marine species. Fishing communities may suffer severe economic losses as a result of closures of recreational, subsistence and commercial harvesting, and lost tourism.


'/>"/>

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers identify 4 genetic hotspots associated with psoriasis
2. BIO-key(R) Fingerprint Biometrics Media Spotlights
3. Molecules in the spotlight
4. New model predicts hot spots for mercury in fish
5. Jupiters shrinking red spot
6. Neuroinformatics special issue spotlights the Neuroscience Information Framework
7. Spotlight on cosmetic ingredients conference
8. Farmers can spot lame sheep, but fail to prevent footrot spread
9. New method identifies meth hot spots
10. Major European program for the environment under the spotlight in Lille, France
11. Fossil and molecular evidence reveals the history of major marine biodiversity hotspots
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/28/2017)... 2017 News solutions for biometrics, bag drop ... ... 14 to 16 March, Materna will present its complete end-to-end ... travel is a real benefit for passengers. To accelerate the ... passenger touch point solutions to take passengers through the complete ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... , Feb. 24, 2017  EyeLock LLC, a leader ... its elite iris biometric solution on the latest ... LTE at Mobile World Congress 2017 (February ... Booth in Hall 3, Stand 3E10. ... Qualcomm Haven™ security platform—a combination of hardware, ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... 2017  Genos, a community for personal genetic ... received Laboratory Accreditation from the College of American ... laboratories that meet stringent requirements around quality, accuracy ... "Genos is committed to maintaining the ... honored to be receiving CAP accreditation," said ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/27/2017)... Yorba Linda, Ca (PRWEB) , ... March 27, ... ... and metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) generally produce small, heterogeneous samples with limited tumor ... progress, analytical challenges remain to be resolved, such as the need for reliable ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... Infectex Ltd., a Russian portfolio company of Maxwell Biotech Venture Fund (MBVF), today ... standard drug therapy regimen in patients with multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDR-TB). SQ109 is a ... ) and the US National Institutes of Health. Continue ... ... ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... 2017  The global market for clinical laboratory ... a new report from Kalorama Information.  In addition ... to evaluate disease progression, monitor drug treatment and ... The healthcare market research firm,s report, ... overview of the medical laboratory industry and the ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... -- Perthera,s Chief Bioinformatics Officer and research faculty member at ... will be speaking at the American Medical Informatics Association ... 2017, she will be speaking on the topic of ... Care" (from 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PST) and ... participant in the "Making Precision Oncology Data More Usable ...
Breaking Biology Technology: