Navigation Links
Could metabolism play a role in epilepsy?
Date:2/19/2014

February 19Researchers from the Franciscan University of Steubenville, Ohio are exploring a possible link between metabolic defects and seizures. They determined that diet could influence susceptibility to seizures, and they have identified a common diabetes drug that could be useful in treating disorders such as epilepsy.

Dr. Daniel Kuebler, the principal investigator behind the experiment, and his lab made the connection by measuring fruit fly movement with inexpensive web-cams. They have published a peer-reviewed, video demonstration of their method in JoVE, the Journal of Visualized Experiments, to assist others in reproducing and further applying the method.

"This technique has allowed us to identify a number of metabolism-altering drugs that affect seizure susceptibility," said Dr. Kuebler, "It has opened up a new line of research looking at the effect dietary modifications have on seizure susceptibility." As published in the article, his lab team determined that metformin, a drug commonly used to treat type II diabetes, reduces the intensity of seizures.

The drug-screening model system is especially ideal for labs on a tight budget, said Dr. Kuebler. According to the article, "Video tracking systems have been used widely to analyze Drosophila melanogaster movement and detect various abnormalities in locomotive behavior. [But] while these systems can provide a wealth of behavioral information, the cost and complexity of these systems can be prohibitive for many labs." Unlike similar experiments, which study the behavior of these flies in aggregate, Dr. Kuebler and his team's approach studies fly behavior one at a time. This is beneficial in that it can determine subtle differences in behavior and seizure alterations, he said.

While there is no known trigger behind seizures in people with epilepsy, Dr. Kuebler and his lab are using their drug-screening technique to investigate potential metabolic causesusing genetically modified, seizure-prone flies (a family of Drosophila flies called Bang-sensitive paralytic mutants). "It is well known that certain diets, such as the ketogenic diet, have effects on seizures, but there is little agreement on the mechanism behind this diet," said Dr. Kuebler, "This technique allows us to better address this question."

Dr. Kuebler chose to publish his method in a video format because of its capacity to communicate scientific procedures better than text. "The ability to show the seizure behavior visually, [showing] exactly how the recording is done, made the journal a much more attractive option than print only journals," said Dr. Kuebler, "This low cost system is simple enough to set up in an undergraduate teaching lab and can allow for students to do some inquiry based learning labs on a budget."


'/>"/>

Contact: Rachel Greene
rachel.greene@jove.com
617-250-8451
The Journal of Visualized Experiments
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Why tackling appetite could hold the key to preventing childhood obesity
2. First biological marker for major depression could enable better diagnosis and treatment
3. Small non-coding RNAs could be warning signs of cancer
4. A role of glucose tolerance could make the adaptor protein p66Shc a new target for cancer and diabetes
5. Asian longhorned beetles pheromone could be used to manage pest
6. Electronically controlled drugs could minimize side effects
7. Cell division finding could boost understanding of cancer
8. Newly discovered signaling pathway could impact a variety of autoinflammatory diseases
9. Genetic function discovered that could offer new avenue to cancer therapies
10. Secrets of potato blight evolution could help farmers fight back
11. Long-lived breast stem cells could retain cancer legacy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Could metabolism play a role in epilepsy?
(Date:4/3/2017)... , April 3, 2017  Data captured ... engineering platform, detected a statistically significant association ... prior to treatment and objective response of ... potential to predict whether cancer patients will ... treatment, as well as to improve both pre-infusion ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... March 30, 2017 Trends, opportunities and forecast ... behavioral), by technology (fingerprint, AFIS, iris recognition, facial recognition, ... others), by end use industry (government and law enforcement, ... and banking, and others), and by region ( ... Asia Pacific , and the Rest ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... , March 27, 2017  Catholic Health Services ... Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Analytics for achieving Stage ... Model sm . In addition, CHS previously earned ... hospitals using an electronic medical record (EMR). ... high level of EMR usage in an outpatient ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... ComplianceOnline’s Medical Device Summit is back for its ... 2018 in San Francisco, CA. The Summit brings together current and former FDA office ... directors and government officials from around the world to address key issues in device ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... ... Disappearing forests and increased emissions are the main causes of the evolving ... those living in larger cities are affected by air pollution related diseases. , That ... countries globally - decided to take action. , “I knew I had to take ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) therapeutics, today confirmed licensing rights that give it ... Nanoparticle), a technology developed in collaboration with Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA). ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... CRUZ, Calif. , Oct. 10, 2017 ... grant from the NIH to develop RealSeq®-SC (Single Cell), ... kit for profiling small RNAs (including microRNAs) from single ... Analysis Program highlights the need to accelerate development of ... "New techniques for measuring ...
Breaking Biology Technology: