Navigation Links
Catching a killer one spore at a time
Date:10/19/2009

A workshop at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama has dramatically improved the ability of conservationists and regulatory agencies to monitor the spread of chytridiomycosisone of the deadliest frog diseases on Earth.

Caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, this disease is probably responsible for the extinction of nearly 100 frog species since the 1970s. During the past decade, the epidemic swept from the highlands of Costa Rica through western Panama. It is now moving toward eastern Panama from Colombia.

"The fungus spreads so rapidly because humans ship nearly 100 million amphibians around the world each year, mainly for food and pets, with virtually no disease testing," said Kerry Kriger, executive director of the U.S. non-profit, Save The Frogs! and course instructor with Sandra Victoria Flechas from Universidad de los Andes in Colombia.

This hands-on course trained 22 scientists on the frontlines to use a genetic technique called quantitative polymerase chain reaction, PCR, which detects even single fungal spores.

"We've probably just doubled the number of people in the world who know how to use this method to detect the pathogen," said Kriger. "The beauty of PCR is that you don't have to kill the frog or take a skin sample to test for the disease."

Researchers run a cotton swab over a frog to pick up any fungal DNA, and use quantitative PCR to evaluate the sample. The technique was developed by Donna Boyle and colleagues in Australia in 2004 and modified by Kriger who made it more rapid, cost-effective and wrote a simplified protocol for scientists with no specialized training.

Workshop participants included personnel from the three institutions in Panama that have laboratory facilities for PCR: STRI, Panama's Ministry of Agriculture and another government research center. Students from the University of Panama and Florida State University, staff from the El Valle Amphibian Rescue Center and a local conservation organization, as well as scientists from Panama, Costa Rica and Colombia, now form a regional disease-testing team.

Darien Province in eastern Panama is one of the most high-diversity amphibian habitats on the planet. Researchers have counted more than 60 amphibian species at a single site. It seems that eastern Panama has not yet been affected by the disease, but scientists are worried. "We have a lot of swab samples from expeditions to Darien, but we haven't had enough people who know how to analyze them," said Andrew Crawford, former post-doctoral fellow at STRI, now professor of biology at Universidad de los Andes.

In Panama research efforts to stop chytridiomycosis are underway. STRI has hosted many of the scientists who have documented the decline. The Houston Zoo set up the El Valle Amphibian Rescue Center to try to save Panama's emblematic golden frog. "Quantitative PCR is extremely useful to us because it can pinpoint the beginning of a die-off," said Edgardo Griffith, director of the center and course participant.

The Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, supported by a consortium of zoos and research institutes and coordinated by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, is building a new Amphibian Rescue Center at Summit Nature Park near Panama City.

"During the next several months we will collect frog species on the brink of extinction. We'll use quantitative PCR to make sure that the center's rescue podsfrog habitats made from retrofitted shipping containersstay fungus free," said Roberto Ibez, Smithsonian staff scientist and local director of the project. "This workshop is a vital part of controlling amphibian die-offs in Panama and ensuring that our amphibian rescue efforts pay off."


'/>"/>

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
703-487-3770, ext. 8216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Catching the common cold virus genome
2. Huntingtons disease: catching it early
3. Natural killer cells keep immune system in balance
4. Killer bees may increase food supplies for native bees
5. Watermelons hidden killer
6. Scientists link immune systems natural killer cells to infant liver disease
7. Termite killer lingers as a potent greenhouse gas
8. Interventional treatment can be recommended as first-line treatment for silent killer
9. Frogs immune system is key in fight against killer virus
10. Shades of 1918? New study compares avian flu with a notorious killer from the past
11. Older killer whales make the best mothers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Catching a killer one spore at a time
(Date:1/22/2016)... 22, 2016 ... of the  "Global Behavioral Biometric Market ... --> http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4lmf2s/global_behavioral ) has announced ... Biometric Market 2016-2020"  report to their ... Markets ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4lmf2s/global_behavioral ) has announced the ...
(Date:1/21/2016)... January 21, 2016 ... new market research report "Emotion Detection and Recognition Market by ... Tools (Facial Expression, Voice Recognition and Others), Services, ... forecast to 2020", published by MarketsandMarkets, the global ... reach USD 22.65 Billion by 2020, at a ...
(Date:1/20/2016)... Jan. 20, 2016   MedNet Solutions , an ... spectrum of clinical research, is pleased to announce the ... achievements are the result of the company,s laser focus ... eClinical , it,s comprehensive, easy-to-use and highly affordable ... --> Key MedNet growth achievements in 2015 include: ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... active R&D program for the development of future natural products ... unique research and development center in Israel ... Stockton has a variety of products ... is active in more than 35 counties worldwide. ... flagship product Timorex Gold ® is used to ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ATCC, the premier global biological materials resource ... and life science researchers that are working to address ... CDC website . --> CDC ... a single-stranded RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family, genus ... Chikungunya Viruses. Zika virus is transmitted to humans primarily ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... , ... February 04, 2016 , ... ... development and compliance training, today announced an interactive FDA compliance training ... The RAPS (Regulatory Affairs Professional Society) accredited interactive course on Morf Playbook—now conveniently ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... Beike Biotechnology, the Shenzhen ... ceremony in late 2015 to mark their successful combined ... --> --> The ... Cell Therapy" was hosted by the Shenzhen Cell Bank ... of Beike Biotechnology Co., Ltd. Shenzhen,s ...
Breaking Biology Technology: