Navigation Links
Biosensor that detects antibiotic resistance brings us one step closer to fighting superbugs
Date:5/8/2013

On May 8th JoVE will publish research that demonstrates how a biosensor can detect antibiotic resistance in bacteria. This new technology is a preliminary step in identifying and fighting superbugs, a major public health concern that has led to more deaths than AIDS in the United States in recent years. The technology is the result of collaboration between Dr. Vitaly Vodyanoy at Auburn University and the Keesler Air Force Base with funding from the United States Air Force.

Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch first characterized antibiosis, the ability for a chemical to kill bacterial cells, in 1877. Since then, the medical and biochemical communities have made great advances in the treatment of bacterial infections. These advances have helped reduce childhood mortality and have contributed to the population growth of the 20th Century. However, natural selection has allowed antibiotic resistant bacteria to flourish and propagate, and continued exposure has lead to the evolution of "superbugs" that are resistant to multiple types of antibiotics.

"Antibiotic resistant bacteria is a serious problem," Dr. Vodyanoy says. "It is very important [when treating a patient] to distinguish between normal and resistant bacteria; if you have a case of resistance you have to take special measures to cure it."

Dr. Vodyanoy's technology takes advantage of bacteriophages, simple viruses that can target and kill bacteria. A bacteriophage, when combined with specific antibodies, can be used to produce a physical color change in a sample that indicates antibiotic resistance. This technology will be invaluable to clinicians trying to treat patients and disinfect hospital facilities.

Specifically, this technique targets antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus, one of the first pathogens characterized as a superbug. Staphylococcus, commonly referred to as staph, often is a bothersome skin condition cured with common antibiotics. However, variations of the staph bacteria can turn deadly when infecting immune-compromised patients or internal organs like lungs and the respiratory tract. The disease is of particular concern to hospitals, prisons, and branches of the military, where individuals are at risk for infection from unhygienic close quarters.

"In our method, we can determine bacterial antibiotic resistance in 10-12 minutes, while other methods take hours," Dr. Vodyanoy explains. Alternative methods used to detect antibiotic resistance need time-intensive purification steps before multi-hour sequencing protocols. "We envision a future where clinicians do tests with real blood or saliva samples. The virus is completely benign to humans, and we hope to use it to make antimicrobial surfaces and glassware that kill the bacteria."

"Our technique is complex and involves many steps and disciplines. It is very difficult to visualize when you read a paper, and we felt it would be very beneficial and educational to publish [in JoVE]," Dr. Vodyanoy says of publishing in the world's first video journal. "We are interested in someone else reproducing our results; this technology can be used on a larger scale and for antibiotic resistance other than Staphylococcus."


'/>"/>

Contact: Rachel Greene
press@jove.com
617-250-8451
The Journal of Visualized Experiments
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Low-cost nano-biosensor to detect foodborne pathogen that causes listeriosis
2. Exclusive agreement to distribute Affinity Biosensors Archimedes system extends Malvern Instruments biopharma solutions
3. Students create low-cost biosensor to detect contaminated water in developing nations
4. Ultrasensitive biosensor promising for medical diagnostics
5. Biosensor illuminates compounds to aid fight against TB
6. Carnegie Mellon fluorescent biosensor reveals mechanism critical to immune system amplification
7. Measuring mercury levels: Nano-velcro detects water-borne toxic metals
8. Lab-on-a-chip detects trace levels of toxic vapors in homes near Utah Air Force Base
9. Made-in-Singapore H5N1 diagnostic kit -- detects all known strains of H5N1 virus with a single test
10. A new method detects traces of veterinary drugs in baby food
11. LCSB discovers endogenous antibiotic in the brain
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/23/2017)... 2017 The report "Gesture Recognition and Touchless Sensing Market ... - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to ... between 2017 and 2022. Continue Reading ... ... ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... Calif. , March 21, 2017 ... analytics company serving law enforcement agencies, announced today the ... as director of public safety business development. ... diversified law enforcement experience, including a focus on the ... In his most recent position, Mr. Sheridan served as ...
(Date:3/13/2017)... -- Future of security: Biometric Face Matching software  ... ... Face Matching enables to match face pictures against each other or against large ... Identification Systems) ... is the fastest software for biometric Face Matching on the market. The speed ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/19/2017)... ... May 19, 2017 , ... In response to the strong base of ... Systems, Inc. announces the release of their Gait Trainer 3 with an Integrated Music ... biomedical system to aid in rehabilitating individuals with cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, stroke ...
(Date:5/18/2017)... ... May 18, 2017 , ... Lajollacooks4u has ... Challenge is a two-hour team-building package designed for groups of 10-30 people. ... Abel, which include items, such as Blackened Shrimp with Edamame Salad, Pizza Rolls ...
(Date:5/18/2017)... ... May 17, 2017 , ... ... enhances its scientific power by providing investigators access to a high-profile scientific ... join the scientific advisory board. “We are committed to offering superior services ...
(Date:5/18/2017)... ... May 17, 2017 , ... ... for varying industries, including food and dairy, munitions, and pharmaceutical/biotech, recently introduced The ... and ease of use. The improvement in technology comes on the heels of ...
Breaking Biology Technology: