Navigation Links
Angel or demon: Can a potentially invasive plant bring a positive influence to a region?
Date:10/25/2013

Can invasive species be beneficial for the region? A recent study, published in the open access Journal of Hymenoptera Research, aimed to obtain empirical data on the activity and distribution of the bee species Braunsapis puangensis in the Suva area of Fiji and examine its association with the invasive creeping daisy Sphagneticola trilobata. The paper suggests that the invasive creeping daisy could in fact have a positive influence on a wild bee pollinator species, thus benefitting crops and biodiversity on the islands.

A recent survey by Mr Abhineshwar Prasad of The University of the South Pacific, reported over 100 species of arthropods associated with road side patches of S. trilobata, including Hymenoptera such as parasitoid wasps, honey bees and solitary bees. One species of solitary bee, Braunsapis puangensis was locally abundant on patches of S. trilobata in the Laucala Bay area of Suva. This bee species is probably of Indian origin and was most likely carried to Fiji by anthropogenic means.

"There is growing concern regarding the global decline of honey bee populations and the implications of this demise for the pollination of crops. In the future we may rely on other insect species to perform crop pollination services, including naturally-occurring native or introduced species of bees," comments one of the authors of the paper, Dr Simon Hodge from Lincoln University in New Zealand. "Pollination success of generalist plants tends to be positively related to pollinator diversity, so any habitat modifications that increase the number of pollinating species present at a site would tend to be of some inherent value."

The situations described above give the impression that the presence of some exotic flowering plants may be of benefit by encouraging higher numbers of pollinating species to occur at a site. Outside of agro-ecological systems, many studies have indicated that even flowering plants considered as invasive may have positive effects on insects, especially on nectar and pollen feeding species.

"Our study suggests it is important to realize that although S. trilobata is considered an invasive 'nuisance weed' in one context, it may be of value to crop growers, and commercial honey producers, by attracting and augmenting local populations of pollinating insects", explains Dr Hodge.


'/>"/>

Contact: Simon Hodge
simon.hodge@lincoln.ac.nz
Pensoft Publishers
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. ChipCares handheld analyzer attracts one of Canadas largest-ever healthcare angel investments
2. Kaiser Permanentes Robert Mangel to Speak at Rock Stars of Big Data: Register Now to Reserve Your Space
3. Found a genetic mutation causing mental retardation very similar to Angelman syndrome in Amish
4. Study in mice yields Angelman advance
5. Maya Angelou Center Brings International Women’s Health Summit to Winston-Salem, NC
6. Vinyl flooring linked to potentially harmful substances at schools and daycare centers
7. Percentage of cancers linked to viruses potentially overestimated
8. Geoscientists unearth mineral-making secrets potentially useful for new technologies
9. Potentially toxic flame retardants found in many US couches
10. Folic acid food enrichment potentially protective against childhood cancers
11. Adaptability to local climate helps invasive species thrive
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Angel or demon: Can a potentially invasive plant bring a positive influence to a region?
(Date:7/1/2020)... ... July 01, 2020 , ... Catalent, a global ... of Teva-Takeda Pharmaceuticals’ packaging facility in Minakuchi, located in the Shiga prefecture of ... located in Kakegawa, the new 60,000-square-foot facility will provide customers with flexible clinical ...
(Date:6/28/2020)... ... June 25, 2020 , ... ... solutions for biopharmaceutical R&D, today announced that it has entered into a ... multispecific antibodies (Multiclonics®), to support their translational and clinical research strategy to ...
(Date:6/25/2020)... ... June 24, 2020 , ... ... software and software-driven clinical data services that accelerate drug development, is collaborating with ... an XPO1 inhibitor, in hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. This is the first ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/11/2020)... , ... June 09, 2020 , ... Reducing carbon emissions ... world. From the Paris Agreement to stock market dips, ways to reduce CO2 is ... biofuels to their portfolio. Most of the biofuels being produced today are created from ...
(Date:5/30/2020)... ... 2020 , ... The Conference Forum is pleased to announce ... the unique role of the Chief Medical Officer in the biotech industry. The ... practices and career development of CMOs and Heads of R&D from different therapeutic ...
(Date:5/21/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... May 21, 2020 , ... ... of clinical trials will cause long-term harm , Contrary to conventional wisdom that ... Institute study finds many companies will emerge from the pandemic commercially weaker, ...
(Date:5/15/2020)... ... May 14, 2020 , ... ... cell (hMSC) working cell banks and hMSC bioprocess systems, today announced the ... collection of hMSC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). RoosterCollect™-EV-CC is the only system designed ...
Breaking Biology Technology: